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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Floyd Frosten
dc.contributor.authorEliuk, Peter Danielen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-23T22:23:37Z
dc.date.available2016-11-23T22:23:37Z
dc.date.issued1984en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/11425en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine whether Forkner Shorthand, offered as a one-year course of instruction at colleges and vocational centres in Alberta, Canada, resulted in students obtaining vocational shorthand skills. The study determined if high attrition rates and low student performance rates prevailed. Also, the study determined if Forkner Shorthand could be recommended as an alternative to symbol system shorthand courses. Survey questionnaires were mailed to all colleges and vocational centres in the Province of Alberta, Canada offering Forkner Shorthand instruction as a one-year course. From the 8 colleges and vocational centres surveyed, 116 student questionnaires and 10 instructor questionnaires were received by return mail. Most Forkner Shorthand classes were scheduled between 5 and 8 hours per week. Responses showed over 90% of the students felt they gained a vocational skill in shorthand and they would be able to use it in their jobs. All instructors surveyed indicated most students would be able to take dictation at a rate considered quick enough for vocational or office use within one year or less of instruction. Nearly 90% of the students felt the course was long enough to achieve their goals. The majority of students (59.48%) expected to be able to record dictation at more than 80 words a minute before graduating. A surprising 113 of 116 students would recommend Forkner Shorthand to others. No instructor experienced attrition rates of more than 20%. Students were able to obtain a vocational skill within one year or less if they enroll in classroom instruction of Forkner Shorthand. Low attrition rates prevailed; high student performance rates existed, and both students and instructors were satisfied with achievements in the one-year Forkner Shorthand course. Students and instructors enthusiastically recommended Forkner Shorthand.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Businessen
dc.subject.lcshShorthand.en
dc.subject.lcshVocational education.en
dc.titleForkner shorthand in the province of Alberta, Canadaen
dc.typeProfessional Paperen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 1984 by Peter Daniel Eliuken
thesis.catalog.ckey3158524en
thesis.degree.departmentBusiness Education.en
thesis.degree.genreProfessional Paperen
thesis.degree.nameMSen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage88en


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