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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jennifer R.
dc.contributor.authorSeymour, Joseph D.
dc.contributor.authorBrox, T. I.
dc.contributor.authorSkidmore, Mark L.
dc.contributor.authorWang, C.
dc.contributor.authorChristner, B. C.
dc.contributor.authorLuo, B. H.
dc.contributor.authorCodd, Sarah L.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-05T16:10:28Z
dc.date.available2016-12-05T16:10:28Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.citationBrown JR, Seymour JD, Brox TI, Skidmore ML, Wang C, Christner BC, Luo BH, Codd SL, "Recrystallization inhibition in ice due to ice binding protein activity detected by nuclear magnetic resonance," Biotechnol Rep Sept 2014, 3: 60-64en_US
dc.identifier.issn2215-017X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12298
dc.description.abstractLiquid water present in polycrystalline ice at the interstices between ice crystals results in a network of liquid-filled veins and nodes within a solid ice matrix, making ice a low porosity porous media. Here we used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and time dependent self-diffusion measurements developed for porous media applications to monitor three dimensional changes to the vein network in ices with and without a bacterial ice binding protein (IBP). Shorter effective diffusion distances were detected as a function of increased irreversible ice binding activity, indicating inhibition of ice recrystallization and persistent small crystal structure. The modification of ice structure by the IBP demonstrates a potential mechanism for the microorganism to enhance survivability in ice. These results highlight the potential of NMR techniques in evaluation of the impact of IBPs on vein network structure and recrystallization processes; information useful for continued development of ice-interacting proteins for biotechnology applications.en_US
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 3.0en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleRecrystallization inhibition in ice due to ice binding protein activity detected by nuclear magnetic resonanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage60en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage64en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleBiotechnology Reportsen_US
mus.citation.volume3en_US
mus.identifier.categoryChemical & Material Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1016/j.btre.2014.06.005en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCell Biology & Neuroscience.en_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEnvironmental Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage3en_US


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY-NC-ND 3.0