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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Philip S.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-05T23:30:49Z
dc.date.available2016-12-05T23:30:49Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.citationStewart P, "Biophysics of biofilm infection," Pathogens and Disease 2014 70: 212–218.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2049-632X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12326
dc.description.abstractThis article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could (1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, (2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, (3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and (4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNIH (R01GM109452); NSF (0728621)en_US
dc.titleBiophysics of biofilm infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage212en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage218en_US
mus.citation.issue3en_US
mus.citation.journaltitlePathogens and Diseaseen_US
mus.citation.volume70en_US
mus.identifier.categoryChemical & Material Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1111/2049-632x.12118en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentBiological Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentCell Biology & Neuroscience.en_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemistry & Biochemistry.en_US
mus.relation.departmentHealth & Human Development.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.departmentPhysics.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage3en_US
mus.contributor.orcidStewart, Philip S.|0000-0001-7773-8570en_US


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