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dc.contributor.authorZhao, Ge
dc.contributor.authorUsui, Marcia L.
dc.contributor.authorLippman, S. I.
dc.contributor.authorJames, Garth A.
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Philip S.
dc.contributor.authorFleckman, Philip
dc.contributor.authorOlerud, John E.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-24T17:51:22Z
dc.date.available2017-01-24T17:51:22Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.citationZhao G, Usui ML, Lippman SI, James GA, Stewart PS, Fleckman P, Olerud JE., "Biofilms and inflammation in chronic wounds," Advances in Wound Care September 2013 2(7):389-399.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2162-1918
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12426
dc.description.abstractSIGNIFICANCE: The incidence, cost, morbidity, and mortality associated with non-healing of chronic skin wounds are dramatic. With the increasing numbers of people with obesity, chronic medical conditions, and an increasing life expectancy, the healthcare cost of non-healing ulcers has recently been estimated at $25 billion annually in the United States. The role played by bacterial biofilm in chronic wounds has been emphasized in recent years, particularly in the context of the prolongation of the inflammatory phase of repair.RECENT ADVANCES: Rapid high-throughput genomic approaches have revolutionized the ability to identify and quantify microbial organisms from wounds. Defining bacterial genomes and using genetic approaches to knock out specific bacterial functions, then studying bacterial survival on cutaneous wounds is a promising strategy for understanding which genes are essential for pathogenicity.CRITICAL ISSUES: When an animal sustains a cutaneous wound, understanding mechanisms involved in adaptations by bacteria and adaptations by the host in the struggle for survival is central to development of interventions that favor the host.FUTURE DIRECTIONS: Characterization of microbiomes of clinically well characterized chronic human wounds is now under way. The use of in vivo models of biofilm-infected cutaneous wounds will permit the study of the mechanisms needed for biofilm formation, persistence, and potential synergistic interactions among bacteria. A more complete understanding of bacterial survival mechanisms and how microbes influence host repair mechanisms are likely to provide targets for chronic wound therapy.en_US
dc.titleBiofilms and inflammation in chronic woundsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage389en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage399en_US
mus.citation.issue7en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleAdvances in Wound Careen_US
mus.citation.volume2en_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryHealth & Medical Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1089/wound.2012.0381en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Education, Health & Human Developmenten_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemistry & Biochemistry.en_US
mus.relation.departmentHealth & Human Development.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US


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