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dc.contributor.authorClingenpeel, Scott
dc.contributor.authorJinjun, K.
dc.contributor.authorMacur, Richard E.
dc.contributor.authorWoyke, Tanja
dc.contributor.authorLovalvo, D.
dc.contributor.authorVarley, J.
dc.contributor.authorInskeep, William P.
dc.contributor.authorNealson, Kenneth H.
dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, Timothy R.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-27T20:30:50Z
dc.date.available2017-01-27T20:30:50Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.citationClingenpeel S, Jinjun K, Macur RE, Woyke T, Lovalvo D, Varley J, Inskeep WP, Nealson K, McDermott TR, "Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota," Frontiers in Microbiology. September 2013 4:274en_US
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12448
dc.description.abstractConsiderable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats(HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences,averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110bp,1349bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on nearfull-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.en_US
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleYellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeotaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage274en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleFrontiers in Microbiologyen_US
mus.citation.volume4en_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2013.00274en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCell Biology & Neuroscience.en_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEnvironmental Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage5en_US


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