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dc.contributor.authorAlbertson, Lindsey K
dc.contributor.authorDaniels, Melinda D
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-27T22:33:40Z
dc.date.available2017-01-27T22:33:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.citationAlbertson, Lindsey K., and Melinda D. Daniels. "Resilience of aquatic net-spinning caddisfly silk structures to common global stressors.." Freshwater Biology 61, no. 5 (May 2016): 670-679. DOI:https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/fwb.12737.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1365-2427
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12457
dc.description.abstractTwo of the most common consequences resulting from land use and climate change are increased fine sediment loads and shifts in hydrological regimes in freshwater ecosystems. Although a growing number of studies indicate that these stressors are likely to directly affect community composition and organism physiology, little is known about how biological structures produced by aquatic organisms might respond. For example, hydropsychid caddisflies (Trichoptera) are a group of globally distributed aquatic insects that spin silk mesh nets that they use to filter feed. These silk mesh nets are important ecosystem engineering structures in flowing waters that can regulate sediment erosion, food particle delivery by altering near-bed current velocities, and enhance habitat availability for other macroinvertebrates. We conducted two experiments in laboratory mesocosms to assess the effects of increased fine sediment and drought on hydropsychid caddisfly silk. We compared silk thread diameter, thread count, mesh pore area, and thread tensile strength across treatments in which the silk nets were exposed to high levels of total suspended solids or to stream drying over 2 weeks. We found that caddisfly silk was resilient to both forms of stress and maintained its overall structure and tensile strength. Our findings indicate that biological silk structures may be viable ecosystem engineering tools following short-lived disturbances associated with increased sediment loads and drying events. Caddisfly silk may be resilient to various forms of environmental change, with important consequences for recovery of aquatic communities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleResilience of aquatic net-spinning caddisfly silk structures to common global stressors.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage670en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage679en_US
mus.citation.issue5en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleFreshwater Biologyen_US
mus.citation.volume61en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doihttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/fwb.12737en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage6en_US


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