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dc.contributor.authorGardner, Robert D.
dc.contributor.authorLohman, Egan J.
dc.contributor.authorGerlach, Robin
dc.contributor.authorCooksey, Keith E.
dc.contributor.authorPeyton, Brent M.
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-31T15:48:13Z
dc.date.available2017-01-31T15:48:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-01
dc.identifier.citationGardner RG, Lohman E, Gerlach R, Cooksey KE, Peyton BM, "Comparison of CO2 and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon sources for triacylglycerol and starch accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii," Biotechnology and Bioengineering, July 2013 110(1):87-96.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-3592
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12486
dc.description.abstractMicroalgae are capable of accumulating high levels of lipids and starch as carbon storage compounds. Investigation into the metabolic activities involved in the synthesis of these compounds has escalated because these compounds can be used as precursors for food and fuel. Here, we detail the results of a comprehensive analysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high or low inorganic carbon concentrations and speciation between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, and the effects these have on inducing lipid and starch accumulation during nitrogen depletion. High concentrations of CO2 (5%;v/v) produced the highest amount of biofuel precursors, transesterified to fatty acid methyl esters, but exhibited rapid accumulation and degradation characteristics. Low CO2 (0.04%;v/v) caused carbon limitation and minimized triacylglycerol (TAG) and starch accumulation. High bicarbonate caused a cessation of cell cycling and accumulation of both TAG and starch that was more stable than the other experimental conditions. Starch accumulated prior to TAG and then degraded as maximum TAG was reached. This suggests carbon reallocation from starch-based to TAG-based carbon storage.en_US
dc.titleComparison of CO2 and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon sources for triacylglycerol and starch accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtiien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage87en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage96en_US
mus.citation.issue1en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleBiotechnology and Bioengineeringen_US
mus.citation.volume110en_US
mus.identifier.categoryChemical & Material Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1002/bit.24592en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemistry & Biochemistry.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEnvironmental Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage5en_US
mus.contributor.orcidPeyton, Brent M.|0000-0003-0033-0651en_US


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