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dc.contributor.authorFabich, H. T.
dc.contributor.authorVogt, Sarah J.
dc.contributor.authorSherick, Matthew L.
dc.contributor.authorSeymour, Joseph D.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jennifer R.
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Michael J.
dc.contributor.authorCodd, Sarah L.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-02T18:25:19Z
dc.date.available2017-02-02T18:25:19Z
dc.date.issued2012-10
dc.identifier.citationFabich HT, Vogt SJ, Sherick ML, Seymour JD, Brown JR, Franklin MJ, Codd SL, "Microbial and algal alginate gelation characterized by magnetic resonance," Journal of Biotechnology, October 2012 161(3):320–327en_US
dc.identifier.issn0168-1656
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12520
dc.description.abstractAdvanced magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation and diffusion correlation measurements and imaging provide a means to non-invasively monitor gelation for biotechnology applications. In this study, MR is used to characterize physical gelation of three alginates with distinct chemical structures; an algal alginate, which is not O-acetylated but contains poly guluronate (G) blocks, bacterial alginate from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which does not have poly-G blocks, but is O-acetylated at the C2 and/or C3 of the mannuronate residues, and alginate from a P. aeruginosa mutant that lacks O-acetyl groups. The MR data indicate that diffusion-reaction front gelation with Ca2+ ions generates gels of different bulk homogeneities dependent on the alginate structure. Shorter spin–spin T2 magnetic relaxation times in the alginate gels that lack O-acetyl groups indicate stronger molecular interaction between the water and biopolymer. The data characterize gel differences over a hierarchy of scales from molecular to system size.en_US
dc.titleMicrobial and algal alginate gelation characterized by magnetic resonanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage320en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage327en_US
mus.citation.issue3en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Biotechnologyen_US
mus.citation.volume161en_US
mus.identifier.categoryChemical & Material Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jbiotec.2012.04.016en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentBiological Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemistry & Biochemistry.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEnvironmental Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage8en_US


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