Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEbigbo, Anozie
dc.contributor.authorHelmig, Rainer
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Alfred B.
dc.contributor.authorClass, Holger
dc.contributor.authorGerlach, Robin
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-11T17:38:20Z
dc.date.available2017-04-11T17:38:20Z
dc.date.issued2010-07
dc.identifier.citationEbigbo A, Helmig R, Cunningham AB, Class H, Gerlach R, "Modeling biofilm growth in the presence of carbon dioxide and water flow in the subsurface," Advances in Water Resources, 2010 33(7):762–781.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0309-1708
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/12688
dc.description.abstractThe concentration of greenhouse gases—particularly carbon dioxide (CO2)—in the atmosphere has been on the rise in the past decades. One of the methods which have been proposed to help reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions is the capture of CO2 from large, stationary point sources and storage in deep geological formations. The caprock is an impermeable geological layer which prevents the leakage of stored CO2, and its integrity is of utmost importance for storage security. Due to the high pressure build-up during injection, the caprock in the vicinity of the well is particularly at risk of fracturing. Biofilms could be used as biobarriers which help prevent the leakage of CO2 through the caprock in injection well vicinity by blocking leakage pathways. The biofilm could also protect well cement from corrosion by CO2-rich brine.The goal of this paper is to develop and test a numerical model which is capable of simulating the development of a biofilm in a CO2 storage reservoir. This involves the description of the growth of the biofilm, flow and transport in the geological formation, and the interaction between the biofilm and the flow processes. Important processes which are accounted for in the model include the effect of biofilm growth on the permeability of the formation, the hazardous effect of supercritical CO2 on suspended and attached bacteria, attachment and detachment of biomass, and two-phase fluid flow processes. The model is tested by comparing simulation results to experimental data.en_US
dc.titleModeling biofilm growth in the presence of carbon dioxide and water flow in the subsurfaceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage762en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage781en_US
mus.citation.issue7en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleAdvances in Water Resourcesen_US
mus.citation.volume33en_US
mus.identifier.categoryChemical & Material Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1016/j.advwatres.2010.04.004en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemistry & Biochemistry.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEnvironmental Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.researchgroupZero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT).en_US
mus.data.thumbpage11en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


MSU uses DSpace software, copyright © 2002-2017  Duraspace. For library collections that are not accessible, we are committed to providing reasonable accommodations and timely access to users with disabilities. For assistance, please submit an accessibility request for library material.