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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Jay J. Rotella.en
dc.contributor.authorForristal, Christopher David.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T18:39:04Z
dc.date.available2013-06-25T18:39:04Z
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1269
dc.description.abstractPost-fire timber harvest practices (i.e. post-fire salvage logging) on public lands are a highly contentious issue in the western United States. Harvest of burned trees impacts a number of species, particularly those specialized for using post-wildfire habitats. We assessed the effects of post-fire salvage logging on black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) nest-site selection and nest survival within burned, mixed conifer forests of south-central Oregon. Multiple treatment and control plots were surveyed two years pre-logging (2003-04) and two years post-logging (2005-06). Our objectives were to (a) examine the effects of salvage logging on black-backed woodpecker nest site selection and nest survival at coarse and fine spatial scales (b) elucidate additional habitat and abiotic factors predicting black-back nest occurrence and survival, and (c) determine if those habitat covariates influencing nest site selection coincide with those influencing nest survival. A total of 210 black-backed woodpecker nests were monitored during the four year postfire period. Postfire salvage logging did not significantly reduce snag numbers or diameters within treatment units. Based upon our best nest-site selection model, black-backed woodpecker nest locations were different from non-nest points in habitat characteristics at both fine and coarse spatial scales, with variables related to surrounding snag density being the strongest predictors. Black-backed woodpeckers exhibited high overall nest survival (78.5%; 95% CL = 0.6996, 0.8495). Nest survival models containing temporal predictors (i.e. Julian date) received more support than those related to salvage harvest or other habitat features. Factors influencing black-backed woodpecker nest-site selection were not same as those affecting nest survival, suggesting a lack of adaptive nest-site choice in terms of nest survival. Our results correspond with past studies outlining the importance of high-density snag areas for woodpecker nesting. Maintaining complete snag species composition and high snag densities will help conserve black-backed woodpecker nesting habitat in the early years following stand-replacement wildfire.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Letters & Scienceen
dc.subject.lcshSalvage logging Environmental aspects.en
dc.subject.lcshForest ecology.en
dc.subject.lcshCavity-nesting birds.en
dc.subject.lcshWoodpeckers.en
dc.subject.lcshBlack-backed three-toed woodpecker.en
dc.titleInfluence of postfire salvage logging on Black-backed woodpecker nest-site selection and nest survival
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.holderCopyright Christopher David Forristal 2009en
thesis.catalog.ckey1512029en
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, Graduate Committee: Vicki Saab (co-chair); Steve Cherryen
thesis.degree.departmentEcology.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameMSen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage93en
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciences
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US


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