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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Robert A. Garrott.en
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Julie Annen
dc.coverage.spatialYellowstone National Parken
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T18:43:51Z
dc.date.available2013-06-25T18:43:51Z
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1294
dc.description.abstractThe bison population of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) represents an outstanding conservation success story, as their numbers have increased from just 46 in 1902 to >4,000 today. Bison are keystone herbivores in YNP, and are central to several management controversies due to their infection with brucellosis. I integrated 100 years of historical count data with 7 years of recent vital rate data, and parameterized a matrix model using these vital rates to validate population growth estimates and to project future management scenarios involving disease control through vaccination and/or culling programs. From count data, I determined that historical population growth rates were heavily influenced by supplemental feeding, resulting in high population growth rates (ë = 1.17). I found evidence for density dependence in two subpopulations, the northern and central herds. The herds displayed divergent population dynamics over 1970-1981 and 1982-2000, as density dependence weakened in the northern herd and increased in the central herd, and herd growth rates were negatively correlated after 1982 (R2=0.40, P<0.01) I postulate the severe winter of 1982 catalyzed emigration from the central herd to the northern herd. Survival and birth rates did not differ between the herds 1995-2001, and calf-adult ratios did not differ between the herds or the periods. I found that snow pack was negatively associated with the central herd population growth rates, and with spring calf ratios and recruitment (R2=0.26-0.60, P<0.05). Birth rates were not variable with density-dependent or density-independent factors, but did vary according to serological status for brucellosis and with age structure, as primiparous bison had lower birth rates than adults. I did not detect reproductive or survival senescence. Adult survival rates were high and static (0.92). Integrating these vital rates into a matrix model resulted in a population growth rate estimate of ë=1.07, which closely corroborated an estimate of ë from count data during 1990-2000 (ë=1.05). Simulating the effects of brucellosis eradication through vaccination programs resulted in ë = 1.09, roughly a 29% increase. I concluded brucellosis eradication could further increase bison population growth rates, exacerbating conflicts outside YNP.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Letters & Scienceen
dc.subject.lcshAmerican bison.en
dc.subject.lcshAmerican bison Control.en
dc.subject.lcshBrucellosis in animals.en
dc.subject.lcshEcology.en
dc.titlePopulation demography of the Yellowstone National Park bison herds
dc.typeThesis
dc.rights.holderCopyright Julie Ann Fuller 2006en
thesis.catalog.ckey1197124en
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, Graduate Committee: Patrick White; Jay Rotella; Keith Auneen
thesis.degree.departmentFish and Wildlife Management.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameMSen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage85en
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciences
mus.relation.departmentFish and Wildlife Management.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US


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