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dc.contributor.authorDowd, Scot E.
dc.contributor.authorSun, Yan
dc.contributor.authorSecor, Patrick R.
dc.contributor.authorRhoads, Daniel D.
dc.contributor.authorWolcott, Benjamin M.
dc.contributor.authorJames, Garth A.
dc.contributor.authorWolcott, Randall D.
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-07T18:56:48Z
dc.date.available2017-07-07T18:56:48Z
dc.date.issued2008-03
dc.identifier.citationDowd SE, Sun Y, Secor PR, Rhoads DD, Wolcott BM, James GA, Wolcott RD, "Survey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencing," BMC Microbiol. 2008 8(1):43en_US
dc.identifier.issn1471-2180
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/13208
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Chronic wound pathogenic biofilms are host-pathogen environments that colonize and exist as a cohabitation of many bacterial species. These bacterial populations cooperate to promote their own survival and the chronic nature of the infection. Few studies have performed extensive surveys of the bacterial populations that occur within different types of chronic wound biofilms. The use of 3 separate 16S-based molecular amplifications followed by pyrosequencing, shotgun Sanger sequencing, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were utilized to survey the major populations of bacteria that occur in the pathogenic biofilms of three types of chronic wound types: diabetic foot ulcers (D), venous leg ulcers (V), and pressure ulcers (P). RESULTS:There are specific major populations of bacteria that were evident in the biofilms of all chronic wound types, including Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Peptoniphilus, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Finegoldia, and Serratia spp. Each of the wound types reveals marked differences in bacterial populations, such as pressure ulcers in which 62% of the populations were identified as obligate anaerobes. There were also populations of bacteria that were identified but not recognized as wound pathogens, such as Abiotrophia para-adiacens and Rhodopseudomonas spp. Results of molecular analyses were also compared to those obtained using traditional culture-based diagnostics. Only in one wound type did culture methods correctly identify the primary bacterial population indicating the need for improved diagnostic methods.CONCLUSIONS: If clinicians can gain a better understanding of the wound's microbiota, it will give them a greater understanding of the wound's ecology and will allow them to better manage healing of the wound improving the prognosis of patients. This research highlights the necessity to begin evaluating, studying, and treating chronic wound pathogenic biofilms as multi-species entities in order to improve the outcomes of patients. This survey will also foster the pioneering and development of new molecular diagnostic tools, which can be used to identify the communityen_US
dc.titleSurvey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage43en_US
mus.citation.issue1en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleBMC Microbiologyen_US
mus.citation.volume8en_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2180-8-43en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage3en_US
mus.contributor.orcidSecor, Patrick R.|0000-0001-7123-3037en_US


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