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dc.contributor.authorRanglack, Dustin H.
dc.contributor.authorProffitt, Kelly M.
dc.contributor.authorCanfield, Jodie E.
dc.contributor.authorGude, Justin A.
dc.contributor.authorRotella, Jay J.
dc.contributor.authorGarrott, Robert A.
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-19T21:43:37Z
dc.date.available2017-09-19T21:43:37Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.citationRanglack, Dustin H. , Kelly M. Proffitt, Jodie E. Canfield, Justin A. Gude, Jay Rotella, and Robert A. Garrott. "Security Areas for Elk During Archery and Rifle Hunting Seasons." Journal of Wildlife Mangament 81, no. 5 (July 2017): 778-791. DOI: 10.1002/jwmg.21258.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-541X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/13711
dc.description.abstractFall elk (Cervus canadensis) habitat management on public lands provides security areas for reasonable elk survival and hunter opportunity. The management focus of maintaining or improving security areas, combined with conservative harvest regulations, may explain why some elk populations have increased in the western United States. However, in areas that include lands that restrict public hunter access, elk may alter their space use patterns during the hunting season by increasing use of areas that restrict public hunter access rather than using security areas on adjacent public lands. We used global positioning system location data from 325 adult female elk in 9 southwest Montana populations to determine resource selection during the archery and rifle hunting seasons. We found that during the archery season, in order of decreasing strength of selection, elk selected for areas that restricted access to public hunters, had greater time-integrated normalized difference vegetation index values, had higher canopy cover, were farther from motorized routes, and had lower hunter effort. During the rifle season, in order of decreasing strength of selection, elk selected for areas that restricted access to public hunters, were farther from motorized routes, had higher canopy cover, and had higher hunter effort. Interactions among several covariates revealed dependencies in elk resource selection patterns. Further, cross-population analyses revealed increased elk avoidance of motorized routes with increasing hunter effort during both the archery and rifle hunting seasons. We recommend managing for areas with 13% canopy cover that are 2,760m from motorized routes, and identifying and managing for areas of high nutritional resources within these areas to create security areas on public lands during archery season. During the rifle season, we recommend managing for areas with 9% canopy cover that are 1,535m from motorized routes, and are 20.23km(2). Lastly, given increased elk avoidance of motorized routes with higher hunter effort, we recommend that to maintain elk on public lands, managers consider increasing the amount of security in areas that receive high hunter effort, or hunting seasons that limit hunter effort in areas of high motorized route densities.en_US
dc.titleSecurity Areas for Elk During Archery and Rifle Hunting Seasonsen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage778en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage791en_US
mus.citation.issue5en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Wildlife Mangamenten_US
mus.citation.volume81en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1002/jwmg.21258en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage3en_US


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