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dc.contributor.authorSimonds, Vanessa Watts
dc.contributor.authorGarroutte, Eva Marie
dc.contributor.authorBuchwald, Dedra
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-05T14:00:51Z
dc.date.available2018-04-05T14:00:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.citationSimonds, Vanessa Watts, Eva Marie Garroutte, and Dedra Buchwald. "Health Literacy and Informed Consent Materials: Designed for Documentation, Not Comprehension of Health Research." Journal of Health Communication 22, no. 8 (September 2017): 682-691. DOI: 10.1080/10810730.2017.1341565.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1081-0730
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/14478
dc.description.abstractMinority populations with health disparities are underrepresented in research designed to address those disparities. One way to improve minority representation is to use community-based participatory methods to overcome barriers to research participation, beginning with the informed consent process. Relevant barriers to participation include lack of individual or community awareness or acceptance of research processes and purposes. These barriers are associated with limited health literacy. To inform recommendations for an improved consent process, we examined 97 consent documents and 10 associated Institutional Review Board websites to determine their health literacy demands and degree of adherence to principles of community-based research. We assessed the reading level of consent documents and obtained global measures of their health literacy demand by using the Suitability and Comprehensibility Assessment of Materials instrument. Although these documents were deemed suitable as medical forms, their readability levels were inappropriate, and they were unsuitable for educating potential participants about research purposes. We also assessed consent forms and Institutional Review Board policies for endorsement of community-based participatory principles, finding that very few acknowledged or adhered to such principles. To improve comprehension of consent documents, we recommend restructuring them as educational materials that adhere to current health literacy guidelines.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPartnerships for Native Health at the University of Washington; National Cancer Institute U54 CA153498;en_US
dc.titleHealth Literacy and Informed Consent Materials: Designed for Documentation, Not Comprehension of Health Researchen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage682en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage691en_US
mus.citation.issue8en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Health Communicationen_US
mus.citation.volume22en_US
mus.identifier.categoryHealth & Medical Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1080/10810730.2017.1341565en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Education, Health & Human Developmenten_US
mus.relation.departmentHealth & Human Development.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage2en_US


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