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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Gerardo A.
dc.contributor.authorWebb, Rebecca J.
dc.contributor.authorChen, Carla
dc.contributor.authorPlowright, Raina K.
dc.contributor.authorSkerratt, Lee F.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-26T15:01:10Z
dc.date.available2018-04-26T15:01:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-01
dc.identifier.citationMartin, Gerardo, Rebecca J Webb, Carla Chen, Raina K Plowright, and Lee F Skerratt. "Microclimates Might Limit Indirect Spillover of the Bat Borne Zoonotic Hendra Virus." Microbial Ecology 74, no. 1 (January 2017): 106-115. DOI: 10.1007/s00248-017-0934-x.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0095-3628
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/14516
dc.description.abstractInfectious diseases are transmitted when susceptible hosts are exposed to pathogen particles that can replicate within them. Among factors that limit transmission, the environment is particularly important for indirectly transmitted parasites. To try and assess a pathogens' ability to be transmitted through the environment and mitigate risk, we need to quantify its decay where transmission occurs in space such as the microclimate harbouring the pathogen. Hendra virus, a Henipavirus from Australian Pteropid bats, spills-over to horses and humans, causing high mortality. While a vaccine is available, its limited uptake has reduced opportunities for adequate risk management to humans, hence the need to develop synergistic preventive measures, like disrupting its transmission pathways. Transmission likely occurs shortly after virus excretion in paddocks; however, no survival estimates to date have used real environmental conditions. Here, we recorded microclimate conditions and fitted models that predict temperatures and potential evaporation, which we used to simulate virus survival with a temperature-survival model and modification based on evaporation. Predicted survival was lower than previously estimated and likely to be even lower according to potential evaporation. Our results indicate that transmission should occur shortly after the virus is excreted, in a relatively direct way. When potential evaporation is low, and survival is more similar to temperature dependent estimates, transmission might be indirect because the virus can wait several hours until contact is made. We recommend restricting horses' access to trees during night time and reducing grass under trees to reduce virus survival.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCommonwealth of Australia; State of New South Wales; State of Queenslanden_US
dc.titleMicroclimates Might Limit Indirect Spillover of the Bat Borne Zoonotic Hendra Virusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage106en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage115en_US
mus.citation.issue1en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleMicrobial Ecologyen_US
mus.citation.volume74en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1007/s00248-017-0934-xen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage6en_US


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