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dc.contributor.authorVoigt, Christian C.
dc.contributor.authorFrick, Winifred F.
dc.contributor.authorHolderied, Marc W.
dc.contributor.authorHolland, Richard
dc.contributor.authorKerth, Gerald
dc.contributor.authorMello, Marco A. R.
dc.contributor.authorPlowright, Raina K.
dc.contributor.authorSwartz, Sharon
dc.contributor.authorYovel, Yossi
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-11T16:59:02Z
dc.date.available2018-07-11T16:59:02Z
dc.date.issued2017-09
dc.identifier.citationVoigt, Christian C. , Winifred F. Frick, Marc W. Holderied, Richard Holland, Gerald Kerth, Marco A. R. Mello, Raina K. Plowright, Sharon Swartz, and Yossi Yovel. "Principles and Patterns of Bat Movements: From Aerodynamics to Ecology." Quarterly Review of Biology 92, no. 3 (September 2017): 267-287. DOI: 10.1086/693847.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-5770
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/14640
dc.description.abstractMovement ecology as an integrative discipline has advanced associated fields because it presents not only a conceptual framework for understanding movement principles but also helps formulate predictions about the consequences of movements for animals and their environments. Here, we synthesize recent studies on principles and patterns of bat movements in context of the movement ecology paradigm. The motion capacity of bats is defined by their highly articulated, flexible wings. Power production during flight follows a U-shaped curve in relation to speed in bats yet, in contrast to birds, bats use mostly exogenous nutrients for sustained flight. The navigation capacity of most bats is dominated by the echolocation system, yet other sensory modalities, including an iron-based magnetic sense, may contribute to navigation depending on a bat\'s familiarity with the terrain. Patterns derived from these capacities relate to antagonistic and mutualistic interactions with food items. The navigation capacity of bats may influence their sociality, in particular, the extent of group foraging based on eavesdropping on conspecifics' echolocation calls. We infer that understanding the movement ecology of bats within the framework of the movement ecology paradigm provides new insights into ecological processes mediated by bats, from ecosystem services to diseases.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGerman National Science Foundation; BioMove Training Group; Minas Gerais Research Foundation; Alexander von Humboldt Foundation; U.S. National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Montana University System Research Initiative; DARPA; SERDPen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titlePrinciples and Patterns of Bat Movements: From Aerodynamics to Ecologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage267en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage287en_US
mus.citation.issue3en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleQuarterly Review of Biologyen_US
mus.citation.volume92en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1086/693847en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US


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