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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Joseph A. Shawen
dc.contributor.authorHogan, Justin Allanen
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T18:42:07Z
dc.date.available2013-06-25T18:42:07Z
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1482en
dc.description.abstractThough its status as a crisis situation remains the subject of much debate [1,2] there does exist evidence that global warming is a real phenomenon [3] and that its processes are to some degree enhanced by anthropogenically introduced greenhouse gases, perhaps most notably carbon dioxide (CO 2) [3]. This claim is backed by observations of increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations from nearly 280-ppm around 1750 to 360 ppm in 1995 [4]. By the end of 2010, this number was up to approximately 390 ppm [5]. To reduce human influence on the global environment, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is proposed as a means of collecting CO 2 generated through industrial and consumer processes and sequestering it so as not to release it into the atmosphere, thereby reducing atmospheric concentrations of the gas. Suggested methods of sequestration include direct deep-sea injection [6], soil sequestration through improved land use and management practices [7], and geological carbon sequestration in which captured carbon is injected into underground geological features. This research focuses primarily on development and testing of a leak detection technology for deployment to geological sequestration sites. A diverse technology portfolio will be required to implement safe and efficient sequestration solutions [8]. Included in this portfolio is technology capable of monitoring sequestration site integrity; detecting and signaling leakage, should it occur. Early leak detection is paramount to ensuring on-site safety and to minimize, or at least understand, potentially harmful environmental leak effects.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Engineeringen
dc.subject.lcshImaging systems.en
dc.subject.lcshCarbon sequestration.en
dc.subject.lcshRemote sensing.en
dc.titleMulti-spectral imaging of vegetation for CO 2 leak detectionen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2011 by Justin Allan Hoganen
thesis.catalog.ckey1659524en
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, Graduate Committee: Rick L. Lawrence; Randal Larimeren
thesis.degree.departmentElectrical & Computer Engineering.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameMSen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage134en


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