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dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xue-Yan
dc.contributor.authorKoba, Keisuke
dc.contributor.authorKoyama, Lina A.
dc.contributor.authorHobbie, Sarah E.
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, Marissa S.
dc.contributor.authorInagaki, Yoshiyuki
dc.contributor.authorShaver, Gaius R.
dc.contributor.authorGiblin, Anne E.
dc.contributor.authorHobara, Satoru
dc.contributor.authorNadelhoffer, Knute J.
dc.contributor.authorSommerkorn, Martin
dc.contributor.authorRastetter, Edward B.
dc.contributor.authorKling, George W.
dc.contributor.authorLaundre, James A.
dc.contributor.authorYano, Yuriko
dc.contributor.authorMakabe, Akiko
dc.contributor.authorYano, Midori
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Cong-Qiang
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-17T21:08:29Z
dc.date.available2018-09-17T21:08:29Z
dc.date.issued2018-03
dc.identifier.citationLiu, Xue-Yan, Keisuke Koba, Lina A. Koyama, Sarah E. Hobbie, Marissa S. Weiss, Yoshiyuki Inagaki, Gaius R. Shaver, Anne E. Giblin, Satoru Hobara, Knute J. Nadelhoffer, Martin Sommerkorn, Edward B. Rastetter, George W. Kling, James A. Laundre, Yuriko Yano, Akiko Makabe, Midori Yano, and Cong-Qiang Liu. "Nitrate is an important nitrogen source for Arctic tundra plants." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (March 2018). DOI:10.1073/pnas.1715382115.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/14846
dc.description.abstractPlant nitrogen (N) use is a key component of the N cycle in terrestrial ecosystems. The supply of N to plants affects community species composition and ecosystem processes such as photosynthesis and carbon (C) accumulation. However, the availabilities and relative importance of different N forms to plants are not well understood. While nitrate (NO3-) is a major N form used by plants worldwide, it is discounted as a N source for Arctic tundra plants because of extremely low NO3- concentrations in Arctic tundra soils, undetectable soil nitrification, and plant-tissue NO3- that is typically below detection limits. Here we reexamine NO3- use by tundra plants using a sensitive denitrifier method to analyze plant-tissue NO3- Soil-derived NO3- was detected in tundra plant tissues, and tundra plants took up soil NO3- at comparable rates to plants from relatively NO3--rich ecosystems in other biomes. Nitrate assimilation determined by 15N enrichments of leaf NO3- relative to soil NO3- accounted for 4 to 52% (as estimated by a Bayesian isotope-mixing model) of species-specific total leaf N of Alaskan tundra plants. Our finding that in situ soil NO3- availability for tundra plants is high has important implications for Arctic ecosystems, not only in determining species compositions, but also in determining the loss of N from soils via leaching and denitrification. Plant N uptake and soil N losses can strongly influence C uptake and accumulation in tundra soils. Accordingly, this evidence of NO3- availability in tundra soils is crucial for predicting C storage in tundra.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKyoto University Foundation; Sumitomo Foundation; Japan Society for Promotion of Science; National Natural Science Foundation of China; National Key Research and Development Program of Chinaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 4.0, This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing you to download this work and share it with others as long as you credit the original creator, but you can’t change the work in any way or use it commercially.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleNitrate is an important nitrogen source for Arctic tundra plantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage3398en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage3403en_US
mus.citation.issue3en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_US
mus.citation.volume115en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1715382115en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US


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CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing you to download this work and share it with others as long as you credit the original creator, but you can’t change the work in any way or use it commercially.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY-NC-ND 4.0, This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing you to download this work and share it with others as long as you credit the original creator, but you can’t change the work in any way or use it commercially.

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