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dc.contributor.authorKant, Ravi
dc.contributor.authorRayaprolu, Vamseedhar
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Kaitlyn
dc.contributor.authorBothner, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-22T20:31:01Z
dc.date.available2018-10-22T20:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2018-06
dc.identifier.citationKant, Ravi, Vamseedhar Rayaprolu, Kaitlyn McDonald, and Brian Bothner. "Curating viscoelastic properties of icosahedral viruses, virus-based nanomaterials, and protein cages." Journal of Biological Physics 44, no. 2 (June 2018): 211-224. DOI:10.1007/s10867-018-9491-x.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0092-0606
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/14940
dc.description.abstractThe beauty, symmetry, and functionality of icosahedral virus capsids has attracted the attention of biologists, physicists, and mathematicians ever since they were first observed. Viruses and protein cages assemble into functional architectures in a range of sizes, shapes, and symmetries. To fulfill their biological roles, these structures must self-assemble, resist stress, and are often dynamic. The increasing use of icosahedral capsids and cages in materials science has driven the need to quantify them in terms of structural properties such as rigidity, stiffness, and viscoelasticity. In this study, we employed Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation technology (QCM-D) to characterize and compare the mechanical rigidity of different protein cages and viruses. We attempted to unveil the relationships between rigidity, radius, shell thickness, and triangulation number. We show that the rigidity and triangulation numbers are inversely related to each other and the comparison of rigidity and radius also follows the same trend. Our results suggest that subunit orientation, protein–protein interactions, and protein–nucleic acid interactions are important for the resistance to deformation of these complexes, however, the relationships are complex and need to be explored further. The QCM-D based viscoelastic measurements presented here help us elucidate these relationships and show the future prospect of this technique in the field of physical virology and nano-biotechnology.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (R01 AI081961-01A1)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titleCurating viscoelastic properties of icosahedral viruses, virus-based nanomaterials, and protein cagesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage211en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage224en_US
mus.citation.issue2en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Biological Physicsen_US
mus.citation.volume44en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1007/s10867-018-9491-xen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCell Biology & Neuroscience.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemistry & Biochemistry.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage10en_US
mus.contributor.orcidBothner, Brian|0000-0003-1295-9609en_US


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