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dc.contributor.authorStoy, Paul C.
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Andrew D.
dc.contributor.authorBaldocchi, Dennis D.
dc.contributor.authorKatul, Gabriel G.
dc.contributor.authorStanovick, J.
dc.contributor.authorMahecha, M. D.
dc.contributor.authorReichstein, M.
dc.contributor.authorDetto, Matteo
dc.contributor.authorLaw, Beverly E.
dc.contributor.authorWohlfahrt, Georg
dc.contributor.authorArriga, N.
dc.contributor.authorCampos, J.
dc.contributor.authorMcCaughey, J. H.
dc.contributor.authorMontagnani, Leonardo
dc.contributor.authorPaw U, Kyaw Tha
dc.contributor.authorSevanto, S.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Mathew
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-01T15:32:07Z
dc.date.available2018-11-01T15:32:07Z
dc.date.issued2009-10
dc.identifier.citationStoy, Paul C., Richardson, Andrew D., Baldocchi, Dennis D., Katul, Gabriel G., Stanovick, J., Mahecha, M. D., Reichstein, M., Detto, Matteo, Law, Beverly E., Wohlfahrt, Georg, Arriga, N., Campos, J., McCaughey, J. H., Montagnani, Leonardo, Paw U, Kyaw Tha, Sevanto, S., Williams, Mathew (2009) Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 in relation to climate: a cross-biome analysis across multiple time scales. Biogeosciences 6: 2297-2312. DOI: 10.5194/bg-6-2297-2009.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1726-4189
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/14969
dc.description.abstractThe net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) varies at time scales from seconds to years and longer via the response of its components, gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (RE), to physical and biological drivers. Quantifying the relationship between flux and climate at multiple time scales is necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the role of climate in the terrestrial carbon cycle. Orthonormal wavelet transformation (OWT) can quantify the strength of the interactions between gappy eddy covariance flux and micrometeorological measurements at multiple frequencies while expressing time series variance in few energetic wavelet coefficients, offering a low-dimensional view of the response of terrestrial carbon flux to climatic variability. The variability of NEE, GEP and RE, and their co-variability with dominant climatic drivers, are explored with nearly one thousand site-years of data from the FLUXNET global dataset consisting of 253 eddy covariance research sites. The NEE and GEP wavelet spectra were similar among plant functional types (PFT) at weekly and shorter time scales, but significant divergence appeared among PFT at the biweekly and longer time scales, at which NEE and GEP were relatively less variable than climate. The RE spectra rarely differed among PFT across time scales as expected. On average, RE spectra had greater low frequency (monthly to interannual) variability than NEE, GEP and climate. CANOAK ecosystem model simulations demonstrate that "multi-annual" spectral peaks in flux may emerge at low (4+ years) time scales. Biological responses to climate and other internal system dynamics, rather than direct ecosystem response to climate, provide the likely explanation for observed multi-annual variability, but data records must be lengthened and measurements of ecosystem state must be made, and made available, to disentangle the mechanisms responsible for low frequency patterns in ecosystem CO2 exchange.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAmeriFlux Research grant DOE/TCP (DE-FG02-04ER63911)en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCCBY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleBiosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 in relation to climate: a cross-biome analysis across multiple time scalesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage2297en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage2312en_US
mus.citation.issue10en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleBiogeosciencesen_US
mus.citation.volume6en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.5194/bg-6-2297-2009en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage8en_US


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CCBY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CCBY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

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