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dc.contributor.authorD'Andrilli, Juliana
dc.contributor.authorJunker, James R.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Heidi J.
dc.contributor.authorScholl, Eric A.
dc.contributor.authorForeman, Christine M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-23T19:29:19Z
dc.date.available2019-01-23T19:29:19Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.citationD’Andrilli, Juliana, James R. Junker, Heidi J. Smith, Eric A. Scholl, and Christine M. Foreman. “DOM Composition Alters Ecosystem Function During Microbial Processing of Isolated Sources.” Biogeochemistry (January 9, 2019). doi:10.1007/s10533-018-00534-5.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-515X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/15155
dc.description.abstractDynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in ecosystems are controlled by a suite of interacting physical, chemical, and biological factors. Growing recognition of the associations between microbial communities and metabolism and intrinsic DOM characteristics, highlight the potential importance of microbe-DOM relationships to modulate the role and fate of DOM, yet these relationships are difficult to isolate because they often operate across confounding environmental gradients. In a controlled laboratory incubation (44 days), we integrated DOM bulk and molecular characterization, bacterial abundances, microbial assemblage composition, nutrient concentrations, and cellular respiration to discern the structural dynamics of biological processing among DOM sources from different allochthonous litters (grass, deciduous leaves, and evergreen needles). We identified two periods, consistent among DOM sources, where processing dynamics differed. Further, bulk fluorescent analyses showed shifts from low to high excitation and emission wavelengths, indicating the biological production of more complex/degraded materials over time. Molecular level analyses revealed similar temporal patterns among DOM sources in the production and consumption of individual chemical components varying in reactivity and heteroatomic content. Despite these similarities, total carbon (C) removed and carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation differed by ~ 20% and 25% among DOM sources. This range in C processing was apparently tied to key chemical properties of the DOM (e.g., initial DOM composition, N content, and labile nature) as well as differential reorganization of the microbial populations that decomposed the DOM. We conclude that the production, transformation, and consumption of C in aquatic ecosystems is strongly dependent on the source and character of DOM as well as the structure of the microbial communities present, both of which change as DOM is processed over time. It is crucial that stream C processing models represent this complexity accurately.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation Division of Materials Research DMR-1157490; Montana Academy of Sciences Student Research Grant Programen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCC BY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleDOM composition alters ecosystem function during microbial processing of isolated sourcesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage281en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage298en_US
mus.citation.issue2en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleBiogeochemistryen_US
mus.citation.volume142en_US
mus.identifier.categoryChemical & Material Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1007/s10533-018-00534-5en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage13en_US
mus.contributor.orcidJunker, James R.|0000-0001-9713-2330en_US
mus.contributor.orcidForeman, Christine M.|0000-0003-0230-4692en_US


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CC BY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.

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