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dc.contributor.authorFlesch, Elizabeth P.
dc.contributor.authorBelt, Jami J.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-25T16:31:55Z
dc.date.available2019-01-25T16:31:55Z
dc.date.issued2017-02
dc.identifier.citationFlesch, Elizabeth P., and Jami J. Belt. “Comparing Citizen Science and Professional Data to Evaluate Extrapolated Mountain Goat Distribution Models.” Ecosphere 8, no. 2 (February 2017): e01638. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1638.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2150-8925
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/15175
dc.description.abstractCitizen science provides a prime opportunity for wildlife managers to obtain low-cost data recorded by volunteers to evaluate species distribution models and address research objectives. Using mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) location data collected through aerial surveys by professionals, ground surveys by professionals, and ground surveys by volunteers, we evaluated two mountain goat distribution models extrapolated across Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. In addition, we compared mountain goat location data by observer and survey type to determine whether there were differences that affected extrapolated model evaluation. We found that all dataset types compared similarly to both mountain goat models. A mountain goat occupancy model developed in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) was the most informative in describing mountain goat locations. We compared Spearman-rank correlations (rs) for occupancy probability bin ranks in the GYA model extrapolation and area-adjusted frequencies of mountain goat locations, and we found that all datasets had a positive correlation, indicating the model had useful predictive ability. Aerial observations had a slightly greater Spearman-rank correlation (rs = 0.964), followed by the professional ground surveys (rs = 0.946), and volunteer ground datasets (rs = 0.898). These results suggest that with effective protocol development and volunteer training, biologists can use mountain goat location data collected by volunteers to evaluate extrapolated models. We recommend that future efforts should apply this approach to other wildlife species and explore development of wildlife distribution models using citizen science.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipRoundtable on the Crown of the Continent; Glacier National Park Conservancy; Montana State University Libraryen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCC BY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleComparing citizen science and professional data to evaluate extrapolated mountain goat distribution modelsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpagee01638en_US
mus.citation.issue2en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleEcosphereen_US
mus.citation.volume8en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1002/ecs2.1638en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage8en_US


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CC BY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY, This license lets you distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon this work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creator for this work. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.