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dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Alfred B.
dc.contributor.authorClass, Holger
dc.contributor.authorEbigbo, Anozie
dc.contributor.authorGerlach, Robin
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Adrienne J.
dc.contributor.authorHommel, Johannes
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-29T00:31:39Z
dc.date.available2019-01-29T00:31:39Z
dc.date.issued2018-11
dc.identifier.citationCunningham, Alfred B., H. Class, A. Ebigbo, Robin Gerlach, Adrienne J. Phillips, Johannes Hommel, “Field-scale modeling of microbially induced calcite precipitation,” Computational Geosciences, November 2018, 1-16. doi: 10.1007/s10596-018-9797-6.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1573-1499
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/15194
dc.description.abstractThe biogeochemical process known as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) is being investigated for engineering and material science applications. To model MICP process behavior in porous media, computational simulators must couple flow, transport, and relevant biogeochemical reactions. Changes in media porosity and permeability due to biomass growth and calcite precipitation, as well as their effects on one another must be considered. A comprehensive Darcy-scale model has been developed by Ebigbo et al. (Water Resour. Res. 48(7), W07519, 2012) and Hommel et al. (Water Resour. Res. 51, 3695–3715, 2015) and validated at different scales of observation using laboratory experimental systems at the Center for Biofilm Engineering (CBE), Montana State University (MSU). This investigation clearly demonstrates that a close synergy between laboratory experimentation at different scales and corresponding simulation model development is necessary to advance MICP application to the field scale. Ultimately, model predictions of MICP sealing of a fractured sandstone formation, located 340.8 m below ground surface, were made and compared with corresponding field observations. Modeling MICP at the field scale poses special challenges, including choosing a reasonable model-domain size, initial and boundary conditions, and determining the initial distribution of porosity and permeability. In the presented study, model predictions of deposited calcite volume agree favorably with corresponding field observations of increased injection pressure during the MICP fracture sealing test in the field. Results indicate that the current status of our MICP model now allows its use for further subsurface engineering applications, including well-bore cement sealing and certain fracture-related applications in unconventional oil and gas production.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titleField-scale modeling of microbially induced calcite precipitationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage1en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage16en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleComputational Geosciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryEngineering & Computer Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1007/s10596-018-9797-6en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage9en_US


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