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dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, V. Hugo
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Chih-Long
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-04T17:28:13Z
dc.date.available2019-02-04T17:28:13Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationV. Hugo Schmidt and Chih-Long Tsai, “Anode-pore tortuosity in solid oxide fuel cells found from gas and current flow rates,” Journal of Power Sources 180, 253-264 (2008). doi: 10.1016/j.jpowsour.2008.01.073.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0378-7753
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/15216
dc.description.abstractThe effect of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode thickness, porosity, pore size, and pore tortuosity on fuel and exhaust gas flow is calculated. Also determined is the concentration of these gases and of diluent gases as a function of position across the anode. The calculation is based on the dusty-gas model which includes a Knudsen (molecule–wall) collision term in the Stefan–Maxwell equation which is based on unlike-molecule collisions. Commonly made approximations are avoided in order to obtain more exact results. One such approximation is the assumption of uniform total gas pressure across the anode. Another such approximation is the assumption of zero fuel gas concentration at the anode–electrolyte interface under the anode saturation condition for which the SOFC output voltage goes to zero. Elimination of this approximation requires use of a model we developed (published elsewhere) for terminal voltage V as a function of electrolyte current density i. Key formulae from this model are presented. The formulae developed herein for gas flow and tortuosity are applied to the results of a series of careful experiments performed by another group, who used binary and ternary gas mixtures on the anode side of an SOFC. Our values for tortuosity are in a physically reasonable low range, from 1.7 to 3.3. They are in fair agreement with those obtained by the other group, once a difference in nomenclature is taken into account. This difference consists in their definition of tortuosity being what some call tortuosity factor, which is the square of what we and some others call tortuosity. The results emphasize the need for careful design of anode pore structures, especially in anode-supported SOFCs which require thicker anodes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDOE Award No. DE-AC06-76RL01830en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titleAnode-pore tortuosity in solid oxide fuel cells found from gas and current flow ratesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage253en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage264en_US
mus.citation.issue1en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Power Sourcesen_US
mus.citation.volume180en_US
mus.identifier.categoryPhysics & Mathematicsen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jpowsour.2008.01.073en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentPhysics.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US


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