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dc.contributor.authorDebinski, Diane M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-13T19:14:21Z
dc.date.available2019-02-13T19:14:21Z
dc.date.issued1996-07
dc.identifier.citationDiane M. Debinski. "Using Satellite Data to Support Fieldwork: Can Species Distributions Be Predicted?" Yellowstone Science (1996) p. 2 - 5en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/15254
dc.description.abstractAlthough species extinction has become a global concern during the last decade, our knowledge of species distribution patterns remains limited. If we don't know where a species has existed historically, we cannot determine if its range is contracting or expanding. This can make it difficult to identify a species as endangered until it is close to extinction. One way to address this problem is to try to predict which species may be at risk based on their habitat distributions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsA government work is generally not subject to copyright in the United States and there is generally no copyright restriction on reproduction, derivative works, distribution, performance, or display of a government work.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://www.usa.gov/government-works/en_US
dc.titleUsing Satellite Data to Support Fieldwork: Can Species Distributions Be Predicted?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage2en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage5en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleYellowstone Scienceen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage1en_US


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