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dc.contributor.authorJuang, Jehn-Yih
dc.contributor.authorKatul, Gabriel G.
dc.contributor.authorPorporato, Amilcare
dc.contributor.authorStoy, Paul C.
dc.contributor.authorSiqueira, Mario B. S.
dc.contributor.authorDetto, Matteo
dc.contributor.authorKim, Hyun-Seok
dc.contributor.authorOren, Ram
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-20T17:08:05Z
dc.date.available2019-02-20T17:08:05Z
dc.date.issued2007-01
dc.identifier.citationJuang, Jehn-Yih, Gabriel G. Katul, Amilcare Porporato, Paul C. Stoy, Mario S. Siqueira, Matteo Detto, Hyun-Seok Kim, and Ram Oren. “Eco-Hydrological Controls on Summertime Convective Rainfall Triggers.” Global Change Biology 13, no. 4 (January 10, 2007): 887–896. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2007.01315.x.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1365-2486
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/15274
dc.description.abstractTriggers of summertime convective rainfall depend on numerous interactions and feedbacks, often compounded by spatial variability in soil moisture and its impacts on vegetation function, vegetation composition, terrain, and all the complex turbulent entrainment processes near the capping inversion. To progress even within the most restricted and idealized framework, many of the governing processes must be simplified and parameterized. In this work, a zeroth‐order representation of the dynamical processes that control convective rainfall triggers – namely land surface fluxes of heat and moisture – is proposed and used to develop a semianalytical model to explore how differential sensitivities of various ecosystems to soil moisture states modify convective rainfall triggers. The model is then applied to 4 years (2001–2004) of half‐hourly precipitation, soil moisture, environmental, and eddy‐covariance surface heat flux data collected at a mixed hardwood forest (HW), a maturing planted loblolly pine forest (PP), and an abandoned old field (OF) experiencing the same climatic and edaphic conditions. We found that the sensitivity of PP to soil moisture deficit enhances the trigger of convective rainfall relative to HW and OF, with enhancements of about 25% and 30% for dry moisture states, and 5% and 15% for moist soil moisture states, respectively. We discuss the broader implications of these findings on potential modulations of convective rainfall triggers induced by projected large‐scale changes in timberland composition within the Southeastern United States.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titleEco-hydrological controls on summertime convective rainfall triggersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage887en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage896en_US
mus.citation.issue5en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleGlobal Change Biologyen_US
mus.citation.volume13en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2486.2007.01315.xen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage9en_US


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