Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Dennis Aig.en
dc.contributor.authorIngrassia, Peter Matthewen
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T18:37:59Z
dc.date.available2013-06-25T18:37:59Z
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1537en
dc.descriptionUrban rats is a film that is part of the student's thesis project.en
dc.description.abstractThe split-screen is a multi-frame technique used in film, television and video. Recent advances in digital technology make it easier to incorporate the fragmented frame into visual narrative strategies. I argue that properties inherent to the split-screen technique (including simultaneity, symmetry, visual irony, omniscient view and visual style) also emerge as attributes of a split-screen aesthetic. The split-screen aesthetic transforms a technical contrivance that has long provided an alternative to parallel editing, into a powerful narrative tool that facilitates the construction of visual stories in a spatial context. I trace the history of the use of split-screen by describing its function in selected visual works, including a medieval triptych painting, a 20th Century art installation, two films and a contemporary television program. A close analysis of a dual-screen video art installation helps characterize elements of the cinematic split-screen aesthetic. I also provide an account of the application of a split-screen design in my own experimental short video. As multi-screen formats continue to evolve, they invoke the split-screen aesthetic to shape the stories emerging from new spaces.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Arts & Architectureen
dc.subject.lcshAestheticsen
dc.subject.lcshStorytellingen
dc.subject.lcshHistoryen
dc.titleThe split-screen aesthetic : connecting meaning between fragmented framesen
dc.title.alternativeUrban ratsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2009 by Peter Matthew Ingrassiaen
thesis.catalog.ckey1471547en
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, Graduate Committee: Simon Dixon; Walter Metzen
thesis.degree.departmentFilm & Photography.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameMFAen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage47en
mus.relation.departmentFilm & Photography.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage24en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


MSU uses DSpace software, copyright © 2002-2017  Duraspace. For library collections that are not accessible, we are committed to providing reasonable accommodations and timely access to users with disabilities. For assistance, please submit an accessibility request for library material.