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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Erin
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Selena
dc.contributor.authorRunning Crane, MaryAnn
dc.contributor.authorEggers, Margaret J.
dc.contributor.authorPierre, Mike
dc.contributor.authorFlagg, Kenneth A.
dc.contributor.authorByker Shanks, Carmen
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-24T17:58:29Z
dc.date.available2020-06-24T17:58:29Z
dc.date.issued2019-11
dc.identifier.citationSmith, Erin, Selena Ahmed, Virgil Dupuis, MaryAnn Running Crane, Margaret Eggers, Mike Pierre, Kenneth Flagg, and Carmen Byker Shanks. “Contribution of Wild Foods to Diet, Food Security, and Cultural Values Amidst Climate Change.” Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development (November 22, 2019): 1–24. doi:10.5304/jafscd.2019.09b.011.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2152-0801
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/15957
dc.description.abstractWild foods are recognized to contribute to diet and food security through enhancing the availability of local, diverse, and nonmarket food sources. We investigated the contribution of wild foods to diet, food security, and cultural identity in a Native American[1] community in the context of climate change. Structured interviews were conducted with low-income residents of the Flathead Indian Reser­vation[2] in Northwestern Montana who participate in the federal Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations, also known by participants as ‘Commodities.’ Responses to structured questions were analyzed for frequency, and open-ended responses were coded and analyzed to identify prevalent themes. Our analysis indicated that half of participants were food insecure. Approximately 28% of participants engaged in at least one wild food procurement activity, including hunting, fishing, and harvesting. On average, participants who engaged in one or more wild food procure­ment activities were more food secure than those who did not. Results highlight the multidimen­sional valuation of wild foods by participants including taste, freshness, nutritional quality, being a traditional community practice, and providing a sense of self-sufficiency. Climate change is per­ceived by participants to be adversely impacting wild food systems due to increased variability in seasonality and precipitation and increased inci­dences of wild fire. Findings point to the need for community-based strategies to strengthen wild food knowledge toward enhancing food sover­eignty in Native American communities, in the context of climate change. [1] The term ‘Native American’ was determined to be the preferred term for referencing the Native American community in this study, based on consultation from our community advisory board. [2] The term ‘Flathead Indian Reservation’ was determined to be the preferred term for referencing the location in which this study was held, based on consultation from our community advisory board.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rights© This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY 4.0 licenseen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.titleContribution of wild foods to diet, food security, and cultural values amidst climate changeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage191en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage214en_US
mus.citation.issueBen_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Developmenten_US
mus.citation.volume9en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.5304/jafscd.2019.09b.011en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Education, Health & Human Developmenten_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentHealth & Human Development.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMathematical Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage7en_US


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© This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY 4.0 license
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY 4.0 license