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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Greg Francisen
dc.contributor.authorDeFries, Elizabeth Shawen
dc.coverage.spatialAlaskaen
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-09T21:03:47Z
dc.date.available2021-11-09T21:03:47Z
dc.date.issued2020en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/16002en
dc.description.abstractOne of the key challenges in ecology is understanding the drivers of animal movements and distributions. Here, I used remote camera photography to examine whether the timing of spawning salmon altered ungulate space use due to the presence of bears. Using observational data collection methods, I quantified ungulate and bear presence at individual salmon spawning sites. I then analyzed relationships between bear and ungulate detection data to test for indirect effects between salmon and ungulates by applying linear regression models. A zero-inflated negative binomial model suggested that increases in bear detections are associated with decreases in ungulate detections. Results did reveal little overlap in the timing of ungulate and bear use of stream habitat during salmon spawning times, however, rigorous testing of my hypothesis may be limited by low rates of ungulate detection. Research dedicated to understanding the indirect effects of the timing of salmon spawning in the Copper River Delta can help evaluate the evidence for trophic interactions at various ecosystem levels. It may also offer insights into the potential magnitude the impact salmon has on the prey of large predators, other herbivore densities, plant communities, riparian area morphology, and essential ecosystem functions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Letters & Scienceen
dc.subject.lcshSalmonen
dc.subject.lcshSpawningen
dc.subject.lcshBearsen
dc.subject.lcshUngulatesen
dc.subject.lcshPredation (Biology)en
dc.subject.lcshRiparian areasen
dc.subject.lcshEcologyen
dc.titleDo spawning salmon indirectly influence ungulate space use in the Copper River Delta, Alaska by attracting bears?en
dc.typeProfessional Paperen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2020 by Elizabeth Shaw DeFriesen
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, C. John Graves; William Deacyen
thesis.degree.departmentMaster of Science in Science Education.en
thesis.degree.genreProfessional Paperen
thesis.degree.nameMSen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage65en
mus.relation.departmentMaster of Science in Science Education.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage22en


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