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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Julia Hobson Haggertyen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Kristin Kingsburyen
dc.contributor.otherJulia H. Haggerty was a co-author of the article, 'Devolved governance and alternative dispute resolutions: an example from the Bakken' in the volume 'Governing shale gas: development, citizen participation and decision making in the US, Canada, Australia and Europe' which is contained within this dissertation.en
dc.contributor.otherJulia H. Haggerty, David Kay and Roger Coupal were co-authors of the article, 'Using shared services to mitigate boomtown impacts in the Bakken Shale play: resourcefulness or over-adaptation?' in the journal 'Journal of rural and community development' which is contained within this dissertation.en
dc.contributor.otherJulia H. Haggerty was a co-author of the article, 'Exploitable ambiguities & the unruliness of natural resource dependence: public infrastructure in North Dakota's Bakken Formation' in the journal 'Journal of rural studies' which is contained within this dissertation.en
dc.contributor.otherJulia H. Haggerty was a co-author of the article, 'How energy communities subsidize industry: road infrastructure investments in the Bakken Shale Formation, U.S.' submitted to the journal 'Annals of the American Association of Geographers' which is contained within this dissertation.en
dc.coverage.spatialBakken Formationen
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-03T17:50:42Z
dc.date.available2022-01-03T17:50:42Z
dc.date.issued2020en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/16055
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation argues that public infrastructure investments are a primary way in which communities subsidize unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development at the local level. Notably, these direct and indirect costs are often ignored in assessments of the UOG industry's distribution of costs and benefits. Natural resource extraction typically requires large capital investments from the public and private sectors, particularly in rural and remote geographies. This creates a risk of resource dependence as communities that over-accommodate industry may struggle with large municipal debts and/or underutilized facilities once industry leaves. While public infrastructure investments are typically assumed to mutually benefit the public and industry, the extent to which infrastructure benefits communities in the long run is unclear. UOG heightens these unknowns due to its volatility. UOG is a particularly infrastructure-dependent resource due to the industry's geographically dispersed nature and subsequent labor intensity. Yet, there is surprisingly limited research on the capacity of local governments to address the burdens of UOG development on public infrastructure and government services. This research addresses these knowledge gaps through a series of case studies on infrastructure investments that communities made during the boom in UOG in the Bakken Shale Formation (eastern Montana and western North Dakota, United States). It uses a mixed-methods approach, drawing on over 90 stakeholder interviews, document analyses, participant observations, and extensive field research. The findings suggest that communities in the Bakken struggled with infrastructure decisions due to the overwhelming pace, scale, and unpredictability of the UOG industry. Nonetheless, community leaders repeatedly demonstrated adaptability and innovation as they addressed the boom's challenges. This research demonstrates that infrastructure investments simultaneously reinforced and disrupted economic dependence on industry, illustrating the unpredictability and unruliness of the long-term impacts of UOG development at the local level. In the conclusion, the dissertation argues that unconventional oil and gas (UOG) development creates distinct geographies of production and distinct geographies of public finance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Letters & Scienceen
dc.subject.lcshOil industriesen
dc.subject.lcshCommunitiesen
dc.subject.lcshInfrastructure (Economics)en
dc.subject.lcshMining engineeringen
dc.titleThe inner workings & long-term impacts of unconventional oil and gas development in the Bakken Shale Formationen
dc.title.alternativeThe inner workings and long-term impacts of unconventional oil and gas development in the Bakken Shale Formationen
dc.typeDissertationen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2020 by Kristin Kingsbury Smithen
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, Graduate Committee: Jamie McEvoy; William Wyckoff; David Kayen
thesis.degree.departmentEarth Sciences.en
thesis.degree.genreDissertationen
thesis.degree.namePhDen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage278en
mus.data.thumbpage43en


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