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dc.contributor.authorHarley, Amy E.
dc.contributor.authorFrazer, David
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Tyler
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Terron C.
dc.contributor.authorCarnegie, Nicole B.
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-21T20:28:43Z
dc.date.available2021-01-21T20:28:43Z
dc.date.issued2020-03
dc.identifier.citationHarley, Amy E., David Frazer, Tyler Weber, Terron C. Edwards, and Nicole Carnegie. “No Longer an Island: A Social Network Intervention Engaging Black Men Through CBPR.” American Journal of Men’s Health 14, no. 2 (March 2020): 155798832091338. doi:10.1177/1557988320913387.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1557-9883
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/16105
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to assess outcomes from a multilevel social network intervention to promote the health of Black men. Through a community–academic collaboration and using a participatory research approach, we implemented the intervention over 4 years in a 110-block area of an urban neighborhood. The project aimed to implement a neighborhood peer outreach and leadership network to strengthen social support of Black men and increase community and family engagement. Intervention activities included three 12-month intergenerational peer support groups (N = 46), a door-to-door outreach campaign (N = 186), media and communication efforts, and a community partner network. Primary outcomes for the peer support groups were measured using a pretest/posttest cohort design and included social support, perceived stress, social capital, and global self-esteem. Primary outcomes for the door-to-door outreach campaign were measured using a repeated cross-sectional design and included a sense of community, neighborhood social interaction, perceived neighborhood control, and self-rated health status. Significant findings from the peer support groups included an increase in social support overall (p = .027), driven by improvements in guidance, reliable alliance, and reassurance of worth; and an improvement in perceived stress (p = .047). Significant findings from the door-to-door outreach campaign included increases in neighborhood social interaction (p < .0001) and perceived neighborhood control (p = .036). This project provides evidence that a participatory approach to planning and delivering a health promotion intervention aimed at creating positive social spaces and enhancing social connections can result in significant outcomes and successful engagement of Black men.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rights© This published version is made available under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 license.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.titleNo Longer an Island: A Social Network Intervention Engaging Black Men Through CBPRen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.issue2en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleAmerican Journal of Men’s Healthen_US
mus.citation.volume14en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1177/1557988320913387en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentMathematical Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage9en_US


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