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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Mary P. Miles.en
dc.contributor.authorKirwan, Rochelle Dianen
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T18:39:57Z
dc.date.available2013-06-25T18:39:57Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/1646en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle hypertrophy and strength gains in athletes can be equally attained through dietary protein intake versus protein supplementation. Methods: Performance measures, body composition, and blood lipids were compared in redshirt football players who completed an eleven week protocol of either protein supplementation (S, n=6, 28 grams 3x/week) versus whole food protein (NS, n=9, 8-28 grams 3x/week). Subjects completed two 3-day diet records to determine nutrient intake. Results: Both groups reported meeting their protein requirements, but caloric intake was below the recommendation. Similar increases (P=0.003) in lean body mass were measured in the S (pre 72.2 ± 6.6, post 73.0 ± 6.3 kg) and NS groups (69.3 ± 8.6, post 70.9 ± 8.8 kg). No significant differences were found between the two groups in performance variables. For example, bench press increased (P=0.01) from 251 ± 32 to 264 ± 36 pounds in the S group and from 245 ± 26 to 256 ± 28 in the NS group. Conclusion: Both S and NS groups consumed on average at least the recommended protein intake and protein supplementation did not offer any performance or anabolic advantage over whole food protein.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Education, Health & Human Developmenten
dc.subject.lcshProteins.en
dc.subject.lcshMuscle strength.en
dc.subject.lcshFootball.en
dc.subject.lcshCollege students.en
dc.subject.lcshNutrition.en
dc.titleDietary protein versus supplemental protein in collegiate football athletesen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.holderCopyright Rochelle Dian Kirwan 2008en
thesis.catalog.ckey1337083en
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, Graduate Committee: Mary P. Miles (chairperson); Lynn Owens; Alison Harmonen
thesis.degree.departmentHealth & Human Development.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameMSen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage109en
mus.relation.departmentHealth & Human Development.en_US


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