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dc.contributor.authorPeyton, Brent M.
dc.contributor.authorSkorupa, Dana J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-07T21:28:31Z
dc.date.available2021-10-07T21:28:31Z
dc.date.issued2021-09
dc.identifier.citationPeyton, Brent M., and Dana J. Skorupa. “Integrating CUREs in Ongoing Research: Undergraduates as Active Participants in the Discovery of Biodegrading Thermophiles.” Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 22, no. 2 (September 10, 2021). doi:10.1128/jmbe.00102-21.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1935-7877
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/16470
dc.description.abstractResearch-based courses are a powerful way to engage undergraduates in the scientific process while simultaneously teaching participants relevant laboratory, analysis, and scientific communication skills. In most programs, students conduct a simulated project which effectively improves student conceptions of scientific thinking but does not produce research-quality data. The course described here delivered an authentic research experience by assigning undergraduates an objective from an active grant-funded project. Participants contributed to research aimed at culturing biodegrading thermophiles from hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. Students participated in a backcountry field experience, collecting environmental samples of their choosing and determining appropriate culturing conditions. Following high-temperature incubations, 16S rRNA gene sequencing identified enriched microbial populations, with analytical and microscopy methods tracking degradation and growth. Importantly, several teams successfully cultivated thermophilic plastic-degrading consortia. Student learning was assessed using several methods, including grade distributions on assignments and statistical comparisons of pre- and posttests. A consistent and, in most cases, statistically significant increase was observed in the students’ posttest scores. The grade distribution on summative assessments also suggests that students achieved the desired learning outcomes. Student perceptions of their learning and experience gains were high, with participants reporting improvements in components emphasized in the research activities. Overall, the findings highlight how involving undergraduates in real-world research projects can enhance student interest and ownership of scientific research, along with contributing quality data that inform active studies.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rights© This final published version is made available under the CC-BY 4.0 license.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0en_US
dc.titleIntegrating CUREs in Ongoing Research: Undergraduates as Active Participants in the Discovery of Biodegrading Thermophilesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.issue2en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Microbiology & Biology Educationen_US
mus.citation.volume22en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1128/jmbe.00102-21en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.departmentCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.departmentChemical & Biological Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.relation.researchgroupCenter for Biofilm Engineering.en_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US


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