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dc.contributor.authorAchhami, Buddhi B.
dc.contributor.authorReddy, Gadi V. P.
dc.contributor.authorSherman, Jamie D.
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Robert K. D.
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, David K.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-22T21:52:06Z
dc.date.available2021-11-22T21:52:06Z
dc.date.issued2020-08
dc.identifier.citationAchhami, Buddhi B, Gadi V P Reddy, Jamie D Sherman, Robert K D Peterson, and David K Weaver. “Antixenosis, Antibiosis, and Potential Yield Compensatory Response in Barley Cultivars Exposed to Wheat Stem Sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) Under Field Conditions.” Edited by Stefan Jaronski. Journal of Insect Science 20, no. 5 (August 1, 2020). doi:10.1093/jisesa/ieaa091.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1536-2442
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/16552
dc.description.abstractWheat stem sawfly, Cephus cinctus Norton, is an economically serious pest of cereals grown in North America. Barley cultivars were previously planted as resistant crops in rotations to manage C. cinctus, but due to increasing levels of injury to this crop, this is no longer a valid management tactic in Montana. Therefore, we aimed to understand antixenosis (behavioral preference), antibiosis (mortality), and potential yield compensation (increased productivity in response to stem injuries) in barley exposed to C. cinctus. We examined these traits in eight barley cultivars. Antixenosis was assessed by counting number of eggs per stem and antibiosis was assessed by counting infested stems, dead larvae, and stems cut by mature larvae. Potential yield compensation was evaluated by comparing grain yield from three categories of stem infestation: 1) uninfested, 2) infested with dead larva, and 3) infested cut by mature larva at crop maturity. We found the greatest number of eggs per infested stem (1.80 ± 0.04), the highest proportion of infested stems (0.63 ± 0.01), and the highest proportion of cut stems (0.33 ± 0.01) in ‘Hockett’. Seven out of eight cultivars had greater grain weight for infested stems than for uninfested stems. These cultivars may have compensatory responses to larval feeding injury. Overall, these barley cultivars contain varying levels of antixenosis, antibiosis, and differing levels of yield compensation. Our results provide foundational knowledge on barley traits that will provide a framework to further develop C. cinctus resistant or tolerant barley cultivars.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rights© This final published version is made available under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 license.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0en_US
dc.titleAntixenosis, Antibiosis, and Potential Yield Compensatory Response in Barley Cultivars Exposed to Wheat Stem Sawfly (Hymenoptera: Cephidae) under Field Conditionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.issue5en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleJournal of Insect Scienceen_US
mus.citation.volume20en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1093/jisesa/ieaa091en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentPlant Sciences & Plant Pathology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage10en_US


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