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dc.contributor.authorIshaq, Suzanne L.
dc.contributor.authorSeipel, Tim F.
dc.contributor.authorYeoman, Carl J.
dc.contributor.authorMenalled, Fabian D.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-22T22:37:50Z
dc.date.available2021-11-22T22:37:50Z
dc.date.issued2020-08
dc.identifier.citationIshaq, Suzanne L., Tim Seipel, Carl Yeoman, and Fabian D. Menalled. “Dryland Cropping Systems, Weed Communities, and Disease Status Modulate the Effect of Climate Conditions on Wheat Soil Bacterial Communities.” Edited by Angela D. Kent. mSphere 5, no. 4 (August 26, 2020). doi:10.1128/msphere.00340-20.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2379-5042
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/16553
dc.description.abstractLittle knowledge exists on how soil bacteria in agricultural settings are impacted by management practices and environmental conditions in current and predicted climate scenarios. We assessed the impact of soil moisture, soil temperature, weed communities, and disease status on soil bacterial communities in three cropping systems: (i) conventional no-till (CNT) systems utilizing synthetic pesticides and herbicides, (ii) USDA-certified tilled organic (OT) systems, and (iii) USDA-certified organic systems with sheep grazing (OG). Sampling date within the growing season and associated soil temperature and moisture exerted the greatest effect on bacterial communities, followed by cropping system, Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) infection status, and weed community. Soil temperature was negatively correlated with bacterial richness and evenness, while soil moisture was positively correlated with bacterial richness and evenness. Soil temperature and soil moisture independently altered soil bacterial community similarity between treatments. Inoculation of wheat with WSMV altered the associated soil bacteria, and there were interactions between disease status and cropping system, sampling date, and climate conditions, indicating the effect of multiple stressors on bacterial communities in soil. In May and July, cropping system altered the effect of climate change on the bacterial community composition in hotter conditions and in hotter and drier conditions compared to ambient conditions, in samples not treated with WSMV. Overall, this study indicates that predicted climate modifications as well as biological stressors play a fundamental role in the impact of cropping systems on soil bacterial communities.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rights© This final published version is made available under the CC-BY 4.0 license.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0en_US
dc.titleDryland Cropping Systems, Weed Communities, and Disease Status Modulate the Effect of Climate Conditions on Wheat Soil Bacterial Communitiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.issue4en_US
mus.citation.volume5en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1128/mSphere.00340-20en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.departmentAnimal & Range Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US


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