Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEbel, Roland
dc.contributor.authorde Jesus Mendez Aguilar, Maria
dc.contributor.authorAriel Castillo Cocom, Juan
dc.contributor.authorKissman, Susanne
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-04T17:57:53Z
dc.date.available2022-03-04T17:57:53Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationEbel R., de Jesús Méndez Aguilar M., Castillo Cocom J.A., Kissmann S. (2019) Genetic Diversity in Nutritious Leafy Green Vegetable—Chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius). In: Nandwani D. (eds) Genetic Diversity in Horticultural Plants. Sustainable Development and Biodiversity, vol 22. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-96454-6_6en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-3-319-96453-9
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/16683
dc.description.abstractChaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius ssp. aconitifolius Breckon) is a fast-growing, semi-perennial, and semi-woody Mesoamerican euphorbiaceous. It is used as a leafy green vegetable and prevailingly cropped in tropical savanna climate. However, cropping of chaya is possible in both dryer and more humid climates. Although the crop has its origin in the Maya region of Southeast Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize, chaya is popular throughout Mesoamerica. Due to its high nutritional value, cooked chaya leaves are an essential ingredient of the diet of Maya communities, especially in Southeast Mexico. Chaya is also used as an ornamental plant, for forage, and in traditional Maya medicine, where it is used to cure a wide range of diseases such as diabetes, kidney problems, arteriosclerosis, gallstones, and high cholesterol. Chaya can be called a semi-domesticated plant: Apart from wild chaya, there are four chaya varieties, whose grade of domestication varies from cropped almost wild phenotypes to entirely domesticated: ‘Chayamansa,’ ‘Redonda,’ ‘Estrella,’ and ‘Picuda.’en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGenetic Diversity in Nutritious Leafy Green Vegetable-Chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius)en_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage161en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage189en_US
mus.citation.volume22en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-96454-6_6en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Education, Health & Human Developmenten_US
mus.relation.departmentHealth & Human Development.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage6en_US
mus.citation.booktitleGenetic Diversity in Horticultural Plants. Sustainable Development and Biodiversityen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


MSU uses DSpace software, copyright © 2002-2017  Duraspace. For library collections that are not accessible, we are committed to providing reasonable accommodations and timely access to users with disabilities. For assistance, please submit an accessibility request for library material.