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dc.contributor.authorMoore, Lauren J.
dc.contributor.authorArietta, A. Z. Andis
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Daniel T.
dc.contributor.authorHuijser, Marcel P.
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-26T19:08:53Z
dc.date.available2022-09-26T19:08:53Z
dc.date.issued2021-11
dc.identifier.citationMoore LJ, Arietta AZA, Spencer DT, Huijser MP, Walder BL and Abra FD (2021) On the Road Without a Map: Why We Need an “Ethic of Road Ecology”. Front. Ecol. Evol. 9:774286. doi: 10.3389/fevo.2021.774286en_US
dc.identifier.issn2296-701X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/17226
dc.description.abstractOver the past two decades, our knowledge of the ecological impacts of roads has increased rapidly. It is now clear that the environmental effects of transportation infrastructure are inextricable from transportation benefits to economic, social, and cultural values. Despite the necessity of optimizing these multiple values, road planners, scientists, and practitioners have no established methodology or pluralistic approach to address growing ethical complexities. We articulate five ethical issues that could be addressed by developing an ethic of road ecology in order to facilitate the identification, reasoning, and harmonization of ethical dimensions of road planning and development. This inquiry into road ecology can draw lessons from existing applied ethics, such as in ecological restoration and urban planning, to build a narrative that is informed by both science and ethics. We illustrate five ethical issues presented through case studies that elaborate on the motivations, responsibilities, and duties that should be considered in ethically and scientifically complicated road building decisions. To address these issues, we encourage the development of a code of ethics, dedicated intellectual forums, and practical guidance to assist road planners, and more broadly transportation practitioners, to resolve complex ethical quandaries systematically. We hope this perspective encourages conversation for a holistic yet pragmatic approach to this applied ethics problem, while also assisting responsible parties as they navigate difficult moral terrain.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen_US
dc.rightscc-byen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectroad ecologyen_US
dc.subjectecological resorationen_US
dc.subjectapplied ethicsen_US
dc.subjecttransportationen_US
dc.subjectconservationen_US
dc.subjectsustainable developmenten_US
dc.subjectlinear infrastructureen_US
dc.titleOn the Road Without a Map: Why We Need an “Ethic of Road Ecology”en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage1en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage10en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleFrontiers in Ecology and Evolutionen_US
mus.citation.volume9en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.3389/fevo.2021.774286en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Engineeringen_US
mus.relation.departmentAgricultural Engineering.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US


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