Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGoemann, Hannah M.
dc.contributor.authorGay, Justin D.
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Rebecca C.
dc.contributor.authorBrookshire, E. N. Jack
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Perry
dc.contributor.authorPoulter, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorPeyton, Brent M.
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-28T22:47:29Z
dc.date.available2022-12-28T22:47:29Z
dc.date.issued2021-08
dc.identifier.citationGoemann, H. M., Gay, J. D., Mueller, R. C., Brookshire, E. N. J., Miller, P., Poulter, B., & Peyton, B. M. (2021). Aboveground and belowground responses to cyanobacterial biofertilizer supplement in a semi- arid, perennial bioenergy cropping system. GCB Bioenergy, 13, 1908–1923. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12892en_US
dc.identifier.issn1757-1693
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/17541
dc.description.abstractThe need for sustainable agricultural practices to meet the food, feed, and fuel demands of a growing global population while reducing detrimental environmental impacts has driven research in multi‐faceted approaches to agricultural sustainability. Perennial cropping systems and microbial biofertilizer supplements are two emerging strategies to increase agricultural sustainability that are studied in tandem for the first time in this study. During the establishment phase of a perennial switchgrass stand in SW Montana, USA, we supplemented synthetic fertilization with a nitrogen‐fixing cyanobacterial biofertilizer (CBF) and were able to maintain aboveground crop productivity in comparison to a synthetic only (urea) fertilizer treatment. Soil chemical analysis conducted at the end of the growing season revealed that late‐season nitrogen availability in CBF‐supplemented field plots increased relative to urea‐only plots. High‐throughput sequencing of bacterial/archaeal and fungal communities suggested fine‐scale responses of the microbial community and sensitivity to fertilization among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria. Given their critical role in plant productivity and soil nutrient cycling, soil microbiome monitoring is vital to understand the impacts of implementation of alternative agricultural practices on soil health.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.rightscc-byen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectbarleyen_US
dc.subjectbiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectcyanobacteriaen_US
dc.subjectmicrobiomeen_US
dc.subjectnitrogenen_US
dc.subjectsoilen_US
dc.subjectswitchgrassen_US
dc.titleAboveground and belowground responses to cyanobacterial biofertilizer supplement in a semi-arid, perennial bioenergy cropping systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage1en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage17en_US
mus.citation.issue12en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleGlobal Change Biology Bioenergyen_US
mus.citation.volume13en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1111/gcbb.12892en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.departmentMicrobiology & Immunology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

cc-by
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as cc-by

MSU uses DSpace software, copyright © 2002-2017  Duraspace. For library collections that are not accessible, we are committed to providing reasonable accommodations and timely access to users with disabilities. For assistance, please submit an accessibility request for library material.