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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: Christopher Livingstonen
dc.contributor.authorWallace, Shane Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-25T18:38:47Z
dc.date.available2013-06-25T18:38:47Z
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/2491en
dc.description.abstractOur society has fallen victim to social seclusion. With the advent of the automobile social energy has consistently drained from our urban cores, forming the sprawling and disarranged suburbs with which we are confronted today. In accordance with this physical isolation caused by personal necessity, there is the dilemma of digital media. Though such technology was developed to facilitate communication with others, our devices have inadvertently caused people to become cognitively irresponsive to their surroundings. Personal necessity has come to diminish social interaction. By assessing the transition and communication between disparate groups of people, and developing a cohesive transportation system that plays off these assessments, people will be compelled to interact with one another while in transit. However, there still remains the issue of the personal device. By developing a scheme that actually responds to the current social media trend, people will be compelled to interact with their environment - and, in turn, with each other. The idea is to deter people from wanting to travel in isolation, while concurrently drawing them together through the actual digital media applications that currently draw our attention so profoundly. The institution of an appropriate public transit system that is linked with social media networks will inherently provide the external stimulus necessary to get people to surrender their devices and interact with one another. The conclusion is to strategically develop a multi-modal transportation hub that is centrally located in a specific urban context that will begin to provide an alternative method of travel other than the personal vehicle. Upon manipulating the existing transit network and developing a public transit center, the entire system is to be linked with digital media kiosks that will provide another means of connectivity between people.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Arts & Architectureen
dc.subject.lcshArchitectureen
dc.subject.lcshSocial isolationen
dc.subject.lcshSocial interactionen
dc.titleExtroverted gravityen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2012 by Shane Michael Wallaceen
thesis.catalog.ckey1926873en
thesis.degree.committeemembersMembers, Graduate Committee: Michael Everts; Thomas Wooden
thesis.degree.departmentArchitecture.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameM Archen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage62en


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