The department's teaching and research addresses critical ecological and natural resources issues for Montana, but also tackles fundamental and applied questions around the globe. Undergraduate programs within the department include Fish & Wildlife Management and Ecology, Conservation Biology and Ecology, Organismal Biology, and Biology Teaching. Graduate programs (M.S. and P.hD.) include Fish & Wildlife Management or Biology and Biological Sciences and an intercollege PhD in Ecology and Environmental Sciences.

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  • Exotic invasion of timberline vegetation, northern Rocky Mountains, USA 

    Weaver, Tad; Lichthardt, J.; Gustafson, D. (1990)
    Thirty-five exotic species were found in vegetation characteristic of Northern Rocky Mountain timberlines. At least 20 percent were intentionally introduced along road-sides. The diversity of invading exotics declined from ...
  • Seeing whitebark pine in a northern Rocky Mountain (USA) landscape: notes for a field trip 

    Weaver, Tad (1990)
    The changing role of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) along an altitudinal gradient typical of the Northern Rocky Mountains (USA) can be seen from the gondolas at the "Big Sky" resort near Bozeman, MT. Whitebark pine ...
  • Berry production in three whitebark pine forest types 

    Weaver, Tad; Kendall, K.; Forcella, F. (1990)
    In the whitebark pine lwhortleberry (Pinus albicaulis/Vaccinium scoparium) habitat type of southwestern Montana, whortleberry plants produced seven to 69 berries I m• X yr in 1974. In subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) habitat ...
  • Biotic and microsite factors affecting whitebark pine establishment 

    McCaughey, Ward W.; Weaver, Tad (1990)
    To enhance establishment of future whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests, information is needed on the physical and biological factors affecting whitebark seed germination and seedling establishment. This paper ...
  • Effects of temperature and temperature preconditioning on seedling performance of whitebark pine 

    Jacobs, J.; Weaver, Tad (1990)
    Four experiments explored the effects of temperature on the germination and seedling performance of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis). While 1 month of stratification increased germination from 5 percent to about 40 percent, ...
  • Stand development in whitebark pine woodlands 

    Weaver, Tad; Forcella, F.; Dale, D. (1990)
    Analysis of density data from stands in the Northern Rocky Mountains shows that, while seedlings establish at the rate of over 1,000 I ha x year in whitebark pine-grouse whortleberry (Pinus albicaulis-Vaccinium scoparium) ...
  • Climates of subalpine pine woodlands 

    Weaver, Tad (1990)
    The climate of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) woodlands is generally cold (average daily maxima and minima in January are -2 and -11 °C, respectively) and snowy 1 to 3 m maximum pack) in winter and warm (July average ...
  • Whitebark pine community types and their patterns on the landscape 

    Arno, Stephen F.; Weaver, Tad (1990)
    Within whitebark pine's (Pinus albicaulis) relatively narrow zone of occurrence-the highest elevations of tree growth from California and Wyoming north to British Columbia and Alberta-this species is a member of diverse ...
  • Occurrence of Multiple Stems in Whitepark Pine 

    Weaver, Tad; Jacobs, J. (1990)
    Depending on the stand, Montana-Wyoming whitebark pines (Pinus albicaulis) may have multiple stems in 8 to 79 percent of the trees. The clumps had one to 11 stems with stand medians between two and three. Multiple stems ...
  • Reference Guide to Whitebark Pine 

    McCaughey, Ward W.; Weaver, Tad (1990)
    The purpose of this guide is to provide an easy access to literature about whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) for those managers and researchers who are concerned with this species. Because of the uniqueness of the species ...
  • Greater Yellowstone climate assessment: past, present, and future climate change in greater Yellowstone watersheds 

    Hostetler, Steven; Whitlock, Cathy; Shuman, Bryan; Liefert, David; Drimal, Charles Wolf; Bischke, Scott (Montana State University, Institute on Ecosystems, 2021-06)
    The Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) is one of the last remaining large and nearly intact temperate ecosystems on Earth (Reese 1984; NPSa undated). GYA was originally defined in the 1970s as the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, ...
  • Estimates of regional annual abundance and population growth rates of white sharks off central California 

    Kanive, Paul E.; Rotella, Jay J.; Chapple, Taylor K.; Anderson, Scot D.; White, Timothy D.; Block, Barbara A.; Jorgensen, Salvador J. (2021-05)
    Determining population trends is critical for evaluating management actions and prioritizing species protections. In this study, we used empirical data to produce an estimate of the population trend for sub-adult and adult ...
  • Retreat but no surrender: net-spinning caddisfly (Hydropsychidae) silk has enduring effects on stream channel hydraulics 

    Maquire, Zachary; Tumolo, Benjamin B.; Albertson, Lindsey K. (2020-02)
    Animals and plants engineer their physical environment by building structures that create or modify habitat. Biotic effects on physical habitats can influence community composition, trophic dynamics, and ecosystem processes; ...
  • The indirect paths to cascading effects of extinctions in mutualistic networks 

    Pires, Mathias M.; O'Donnell, James L.; Burkle, Laura A.; Diaz-Castelazo, Cecilia; Hembry, David H.; Yeakel, Justin D.; Newman, Erica A.; Medeiros, Lucas P.; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.; Guimaraes, Paulo R. (2020-05)
    Biodiversity loss is a hallmark of our times, but predicting its consequences is challenging. Ecological interactions form complex networks with multiple direct and indirect paths through which the impacts of an extinction ...
  • Assessing the Performance of Index Calibration Survey Methods to Monitor Populations of Wide‐ranging Low‐density Carnivores 

    Droge, Egil; Creel, Scott; Becker, Matthew S.; Loveridge, Andrew J.; Sousa, Lara L.; Macdonald, David W. (2020-03)
    Apex carnivores are wide‐ranging, low‐density, hard to detect, and declining throughout most of their range, making population monitoring both critical and challenging. Rapid and inexpensive index calibration survey (ICS) ...
  • Carnivores, competition and genetic connectivity in the Anthropocene 

    Creel, Scott; Spong, Goran; Becker, Matthew S.; Simukonda, Chuma; Norman, Anita; Schiffthaler, Bastian; Chifunte, Clive (2019-11)
    Current extinction rates are comparable to five prior mass extinctions in the earth’s history, and are strongly affected by human activities that have modified more than half of the earth’s terrestrial surface. Increasing ...
  • Sources of Variation in Maternal Allocation in a Long‐lived Mammal 

    Macdonald, Kaitlin R.; Rotella, Jay J.; Garrott, Robert A.; Link, William A. (2020-06)
    Life history theory predicts allocation of energy to reproduction varies with maternal age, but additional maternal features may be important to the allocation of energy to reproduction. We aimed to characterize age‐specific ...
  • Evaluating Native Bee Communities and Nutrition in Managed Grasslands 

    Stein, D. S.; Debinski, Diana M.; Pleasants, John M.; Toth, Amy L. (2020-06)
    Native pollinators are important for providing vital services in agroecosystems; however, their numbers are declining globally. Bees are the most efficient and diverse members of the pollinator community; therefore, it is ...
  • Occupied and abandoned structures from ecosystem engineering differentially facilitate stream community colonization 

    Tumolo, Benjamin B.; Albertson, Lindsey K.; Cross, Wyatt F.; Daniels, Melinda D.; Sklar, Leonard S. (2019-05)
    Ecosystem engineers transform habitats in ways that facilitate a diversity of species; however, few investigations have isolated short‐term effects of engineers from the longer‐term legacy effects of their engineered ...
  • Evaluating Irrigation Efficiency: Toward a Sustainable Water Future for Montana 

    Lonsdale, Whitney R.; Cross, Wyatt F.; Dalby, Charles E.; Meloy, Sara E.; Schwend, Ann C. (The Montana University System Water Center, 2020-11)
    Water is our most valuable natural resource, and is used to support the demands of industry, agriculture, hydroelectric power generation, and municipalities. Water also sustains Montana’s booming recreation and tourism ...

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