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dc.contributor.advisorChairperson, Graduate Committee: John E. Burkeen
dc.contributor.authorParsons, Elizabeth Annen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-12T20:50:48Z
dc.date.available2015-05-12T20:50:48Z
dc.date.issued1984en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/6504en
dc.description.abstractMy sculpture is a record of my experience and it proposes an experience for the viewer. I am seeking a balance which is both engaging and enigmatic. My experience is the process of making the sculpture. I work in an intuitive way, never knowing the exact outcome; the materials and forms show me how they will work together. I want the parts to became a whole and to tell a story, though not necessarily a literal one. I contrast geometric forms with a way of working which is a repetitive and gradual building, similar to the way things grow. The sense of movement I imply in my sculpture relates to movement in nature. I am interested in the way things get caught and built up by wind, rain, snow, etc. My work and processes derive more from my subconscious understanding of nature and my relationship to it, and its rhythms and layerings, than the actual appearance of the natural world. Sone of my forms make references to boats and houses which are both simple geometric, archetypal shapes. The use of the boat form mirrors a movement or journey through life. Boats and houses become our smaller environments and set parameters from which we view the world. These environments are in constant motion and vulnerable to change. Because nature is ever present and dominant, the parameters we define are essentially false, as is our sense of control and stability. Still, it is human nature to look for and attach ourselves to those things. In my newer work, I use paper for its apparitional arid ephemeral qualities which allow the forms to fade in and out. I have stopped using natural materials such as sticks and rocks because their reality does not allow for that experience of a vision which I am interested in. I also do not want to rely on their inherent beauty. I want my sculpture to have a unique and less obvious beauty. My sculptures are both a realization and a completion. They are a manifestation of materials, ideas and processes which have a self-contained, mysterious meaning and function.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Arts & Architectureen
dc.subject.lcshSculptureen
dc.subject.lcshPaperen
dc.subject.lcshDwellingsen
dc.subject.lcshNatureen
dc.titleSculptureen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 1984 by Elizabeth Ann Parsonsen
thesis.catalog.ckey83847en
thesis.degree.departmentArt.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameMFAen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage18en
mus.data.thumbpage10en


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