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dc.contributor.authorAhnen, Phillip S.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-12T20:40:19Z
dc.date.available2015-05-12T20:40:19Z
dc.date.issued1999en
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/8484en
dc.description.abstractThis work is carved using different axes, a process that does not allow modeling, and involves no “finishing touches”. Using these tools, I engage abstraction, and work to reveal myself through the clay. To me, the work is primarily about the nature of clay as a malleable material; it is about the permanent record of my actions left in the wet clay, and vocabulary of expressive mark-making. Secondary to abstraction, is the figure. The figure is the lure for the viewer to engage my abstractions. The human form is common to everyone, and in this scale invites the audience into its personal space. At the' same time, these sculptures are nameless, and faceless, which affords each viewer the opportunity to feel the body before them as if it were their own.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMontana State University - Bozeman, College of Arts & Architectureen
dc.subject.lcshArt--Exhibitionsen
dc.subject.lcshCeramic sculptureen
dc.subject.lcshArt, Abstracten
dc.titleUntitleden
dc.typeThesisen
dc.rights.holderCopyright 1999 by Phillip S. Ahnenen
thesis.catalog.ckey748662en
thesis.degree.departmentArt.en
thesis.degree.genreThesisen
thesis.degree.nameMFAen
thesis.format.extentfirstpage1en
thesis.format.extentlastpage16en
mus.data.thumbpage14en


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