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dc.contributor.authorBrooker, Rebecca J.
dc.contributor.authorBuss, Kristin A.
dc.contributor.authorLemery-Chalfant, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorAksan, Nazan
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Richard J.
dc.contributor.authorGoldsmith, H. Hill
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-07T20:14:03Z
dc.date.available2014-12-07T20:14:03Z
dc.date.issued2014-10
dc.identifier.citationBrooker, Rebecca J., Kristin A. Buss, Kathryn Lemery-Chalfant, Nazan Aksan, Richard J. Davidson, and H. Hill Goldsmith. "Profiles of observed infant anger predict preschool behavior problems: Moderation by life stress." Developmental psychology 50, no. 10 (2014): 2343-2352. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037693en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-1649
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037693
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/8740
dc.description.abstractUsing both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of anger were largely unrelated to later behavior problems, profiles of anger that dissociated typical from atypical development predicted behavior problems during preschool. Moreover, the relation between infant anger profiles and preschool behavior problems was moderated such that, when early life stress was low, infants with atypical profiles of early anger showed more preschool behavior problems than did infants with normative anger profiles. However, when early life stress was high, infants with atypical and normative profiles of infant anger did not differ in preschool behavior problems. We conclude that a discrete emotions approach including latent profile analysis is useful for elucidating biological and environmental developmental pathways to early problem behaviors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipData collection for this project was supported by R01 MH50560 from the National Institute of Mental Health (PI: Goldsmith). The writing of this manuscript was partially supported by T32 MH018931 (PI: Davidson) and K01 MH100240 (PI: Brooker) from the National Institute of Mental Health. Infrastructure support was also provided by P30 HD03352 and P50 MH084051. Salary support was received by N. Aksan from the Toyota Motor Company.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_US
dc.subjectBehavioral sciencesen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental psychologyen_US
dc.titleProfiles of observed infant anger predict preschool behavior problems: Moderation by life stressen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage2343en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage2352en_US
mus.citation.issue10en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleDevelopmental psychologyen_US
mus.citation.volume50en_US
mus.identifier.categoryHealth & Medical Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1037/a0037693en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Science
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Sciencesen_US
mus.relation.departmentPsychology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US


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