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dc.contributor.authorMiles, Mary
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-16T22:42:07Z
dc.date.available2015-01-16T22:42:07Z
dc.date.issued2012-03
dc.identifier.citationMiles MP. Carbohydrates for physical activity: A strategy to avoid undesirable health consequences. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 6:121-132, 2012. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1559827611431053en_US
dc.identifier.issn1559-8276
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/8810
dc.description.abstractIntake of carbohydrates above the dietary guidelines to support performance of physical activity is common but may be unnecessary and counterproductive. Sports nutrition guidelines have not been designed to incorporate characteristics that may make high carbohydrate consumption a source of metabolic stress that may increase oxidative stress, inflammation, and lipogenesis. This metabolic stress is linked to the physiology underlying the development of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cardiovascular diseases. This review describes research-based evidence to aid in bridging the gap between dietary guidelines for overall health and those to support physical activity. Characteristics that increase the likelihood of metabolic stress resulting from carbohydrate intake include overweight and obesity, central/visceral adiposity, older age, sedentary lifestyle, and caloric state. Carbohydrate-based foods that provide the most health benefits are whole grains, beans and legumes, fruits, and vegetables. Carbohydrate-based foods that most readily elicit metabolic stress are those with added sugars and refined grains or that have a high glycemic index. A checklist that incorporates both the number of these characteristics and prevailing guidelines for nutrition and physical activity is presented. This may be useful in determining whether additional carbohydrates are needed to support the physical activity level of the individual.en_US
dc.subjectHealth sciencesen_US
dc.titleCarbohydrates for physical activity: A strategy to avoid undesirable health consequencesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage121en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage132en_US
mus.citation.issue2en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleAmerican Journal of Lifestyle Medicineen_US
mus.citation.volume6en_US
mus.identifier.categoryHealth & Medical Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1177/1559827611431053en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Education, Health & Human Developmenten_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Education, Health & Human Development
mus.relation.departmentHealth & Human Development.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US


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