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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Kimberley T.
dc.contributor.authorBrummer, Tyler J.
dc.contributor.authorRew, Lisa J.
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, Bruce D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-25T21:44:53Z
dc.date.available2015-03-25T21:44:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.citationTaylor, Kimberley, Tyler Brummer, Lisa J. Rew, Matt Lavin, and Bruce D. Maxwell. "Bromus tectorum Response to Fire Varies with Climate Conditions." Ecosystems 17 no. 6 (2014): 960-973. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10021-014-9771-7en_US
dc.identifier.issn1432-9840
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/8948
dc.description.abstractThe invasive annual grass Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) forms a positive feedback with fire in some areas of western North America’s sagebrush biome by increasing fire frequency and size, which then increases B. tectorum abundance post-fire and dramatically alters ecosystem structure and processes. However, this positive response to fire is not consistent across the sagebrush steppe. Here, we ask whether different climate conditions across the sagebrush biome can explain B. tectorum’s variable response to fire. We found that climate variables differed significantly between 18 sites where B. tectorum does and does not respond positively to fire. A positive response was most likely in areas with higher annual temperatures and lower summer precipitation. We then chose a climatically intermediate site, with intact sage-brush vegetation, to evaluate whether a positive feedback had formed between B. tectorum and fire. A chronosequence of recent fires (1–15 years) at the site created a natural replicated experiment to assess abundance of B. tectorum and native plants. B. tectorum cover did not differ between burned and unburned plots but native grass cover was higher in recently burned plots. Therefore, we found no evidence for a positive feedback between B. tectorum and fire at the study site. Our results suggest that formation of a positive B. tectorum-fire feedback depends on climate; however, other drivers such as disturbance and native plant cover are likely to further influence local responses of B. tectorum. The dependence of B. tectorum’s response to fire on climate suggests that climate change may expand B. tectorum’s role as a transformative invasive species within the sage-brush biome.en_US
dc.subjectPlant sciencesen_US
dc.subjectRange managementen_US
dc.titleBromus tectorum Response to Fire Varies with Climate Conditionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage960en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage973en_US
mus.citation.issue6en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleEcosystemsen_US
mus.citation.volume17en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1007/s10021-014-9771-7en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agriculture
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.departmentPlant Sciences & Plant Pathology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US


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