Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorO'Neill, Kevin M.
dc.contributor.authorDelphia, Casey M.
dc.contributor.authorPitts-Singer, Theresa L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-27T19:40:41Z
dc.date.available2015-10-27T19:40:41Z
dc.date.issued2015-07
dc.identifier.citationO'Neill, Kevin M., Casey M. Delphia, and Theresa L. Pitts-Singer. "Seasonal trends in the condition of nesting females of a solitary bee: wing wear, lipid content, and oocyte size." PeerJ 3 (July 2015): e930. DOI:https://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.930.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/9347
dc.description.abstractDuring the nesting season, adult females of the solitary bee Megachile rotundata (F.) face considerable physical and energy demands that could include increasing wear and tear on their bodies and decreasing lipid reserves. Consequently, their reproductive performance may be affected not only by extrinsic factors (e.g., weather and floral resource availability), but intrinsic changes in their own bodies. Because of the potential fitness effects of seasonal changes in body condition, our objectives were to determine how wing wear, lipid reserves, and oocyte sizes vary during nesting seasons, beginning when females emerge as adults. As nesting progressed, females in two populations experienced a steady increase in wing wear, which is known to reduce foraging efficiency and increase risk of mortality in other bees. Soon after emergence, females exhibited sharp declines in lipid content which remained low for the remainder of the season. Newly-emerged females ingested pollen, an activity known to be correlated with the initiation of egg maturation in this species. Additionally, the early summer drop in lipid stores was correlated with an increase in the size of the oocytes carried. However, by ∼6 weeks after emergence, oocytes began to decrease in length and volume, perhaps due to nutrient deficiencies related to loss of stored lipids. Our results suggest management of M. rotundata should include rearing bees at temperatures that maximize stored lipid reserves in adults and timing bee release so that significant pollen resources are available for both adults and offspring.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMontana Agricultural Experiment Station;the Montana Alfalfa Seed Growers Association; the Montana Department of Agriculture; the Western Alfalfa Seed Growers Associationen_US
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleSeasonal trends in the condition of nesting females of a solitary bee: wing wear, lipid content, and oocyte sizeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpagee930en_US
mus.citation.journaltitlePeerJen_US
mus.citation.volume3en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.930en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage6en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

CC BY 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY 4.0

MSU uses DSpace software, copyright © 2002-2017  Duraspace. For library collections that are not accessible, we are committed to providing reasonable accommodations and timely access to users with disabilities. For assistance, please submit an accessibility request for library material.