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dc.contributor.authorGomez, Andres
dc.contributor.authorPetrzelkova, Klara J.
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Michael B.
dc.contributor.authorYeoman, Carl J.
dc.contributor.authorAmato, Katherine R.
dc.contributor.authorVlckova, Klara
dc.contributor.authorModry, David
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Angelique F.
dc.contributor.authorJost Robinson, Carolyn A.
dc.contributor.authorRemis, Melissa J.
dc.contributor.authorTorralba, Manolito G.
dc.contributor.authorMorton, Elise
dc.contributor.authorUmaña, Juan D.
dc.contributor.authorCarbonero, Franck
dc.contributor.authorGaskins, H. Rex
dc.contributor.authorNelson, Karen E.
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Brenda A.
dc.contributor.authorStumpf, Rebecca M.
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Bryan A.
dc.contributor.authorLeigh, Steven R.
dc.contributor.authorBlekhman, Ran
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-03T16:04:01Z
dc.date.available2016-05-03T16:04:01Z
dc.date.issued2016-03
dc.identifier.citationGomez, Andres , Klara J. Petrzelkova, Michael B. Burns, Carl J. Yeoman, Katherine R. Amato, Klara Vlckova, David Modry, Angelique Todd, Carolyn A. Jost Robinson, Melissa J. Remis, Manolito G. Torralba, Elise Morton, Juan D. Umaña, Franck Carbonero, H. Rex Gaskins, Karen E. Nelson, Brenda A. Wilson, Rebecca M. Stumpf, Bryan A. White, Steven R. Leigh, and Ran Blekhman. "Gut Microbiome of Coexisting BaAka Pygmies and Bantu Reflects Gradients of Traditional Subsistence Patterns." Cell Reports (March 2016). DOI:https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.02.013.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2211-1247
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/9739
dc.description.abstractTo understand how the gut microbiome is impacted by human adaptation to varying environments, we explored gut bacterial communities in the BaAka rainforest hunter-gatherers and their agriculturalist Bantu neighbors in the Central African Republic. Although the microbiome of both groups is compositionally similar, hunter-gatherers harbor increased abundance of Prevotellaceae, Treponema, and Clostridiaceae, while the Bantu gut microbiome is dominated by Firmicutes. Comparisons with US Americans reveal microbiome differences between Africans and westerners but show western-like features in the Bantu, including an increased abundance of predictive carbohydrate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways. In contrast, the hunter-gatherer gut shows increased abundance of predicted virulence, amino acid, and vitamin metabolism functions, as well as dominance of lipid and amino-acid-derived metabolites, as determined through metabolomics. Our results demonstrate gradients of traditional subsistence patterns in two neighboring African groups and highlight the adaptability of the microbiome in response to host ecology.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF (0935347); Czech Science Foundation (number 206/09/0927); European Social Fund and the state budget of the Czech Republic (project OPVK CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0300); CEITEC (CZ.1.05/1.100/02.0068); Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (RVO: 68081766)en_US
dc.rightsCC BY 4.0 You are free to: Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms. Under the following terms: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleGut Microbiome of Coexisting BaAka Pygmies and Bantu Reflects Gradients of Traditional Subsistence Patternsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage2142en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage2153en_US
mus.citation.issue9en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleCell Reportsen_US
mus.citation.volume14en_US
mus.identifier.categoryHealth & Medical Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.categorySocial Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1016/j.celrep.2016.02.013en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.departmentAnimal & Range Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage7en_US


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CC BY 4.0
You are free to:
Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
for any purpose, even commercially.
The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.
Under the following terms:
Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as CC BY 4.0 You are free to: Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms. Under the following terms: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.