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dc.contributor.authorBrookshire, E. N. Jack
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Tad
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-25T13:32:54Z
dc.date.available2016-05-25T13:32:54Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.citationBrookshire, E. N. J., and T. Weaver. “Long-Term Decline in Grassland Productivity Driven by Increasing Dryness.” Nature Communications 6 (May 14, 2015): 7148. doi:10.1038/ncomms8148.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/xmlui/handle/1/9876
dc.description.abstractIncreasing aridity and drought severity forecast for many land areas could reduce the land carbon (C) sink. However, with limited long-term direct measures, it is difficult to distinguish direct drying effects from counter effects of CO2 enrichment and nitrogen (N) deposition. Here, we document a >50% decline in production of a native C3 grassland over four decades and assign the forcing and timing to increasing aridity and specifically to declining late-summer rainfall. Analysis of C and N stable isotopes in biomass suggests that enhanced water use efficiency via CO2 enrichment may have slightly ameliorated the productivity decline but that changes in N had no effects. Identical declines in a long-term snow-addition experiment definitively identified increasing late-summer dryness as the cause. Our results demonstrate lasting consequences of recent climate change on grassland production and underscore the importance of understanding past climate–ecosystem coupling to predicting future responses to changing climate.en_US
dc.rightsYou are free to: Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms. Under the following terms: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcodeen_US
dc.titleLong-term decline in grassland productivity driven by increasing drynessen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.journaltitleNature Communicationsen_US
mus.citation.volume6en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms8148en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Agricultureen_US
mus.relation.departmentLand Resources & Environmental Sciences.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US
mus.data.thumbpage5en_US


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You are free to:
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The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.
Under the following terms:
Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as You are free to: Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms. Under the following terms: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use. No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.