Extracting the Heliographic Coordinates of Coronal Rays Using Images from WISPR/Parker Solar Probe

dc.contributor.authorLiewer, P. C.
dc.contributor.authorQiu, J.
dc.contributor.authorArk, F.
dc.contributor.authorPenteado, P.
dc.contributor.authorStenborg, G.
dc.contributor.authorVourlidas, A.
dc.contributor.authorHall, J. R.
dc.contributor.authorRiley, P.
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-26T20:06:47Z
dc.date.available2023-01-26T20:06:47Z
dc.date.issued2022-09
dc.descriptionThis version of the article has been accepted for publication, after peer review (when applicable) and is subject to Springer Nature’s AM terms of use, but is not the Version of Record and does not reflect post-acceptance improvements, or any corrections. The Version of Record is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11207-022-02058-6en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Wide-field Imager for Solar Probe (WISPR) onboard Parker Solar Probe (PSP), observing in white light, has a fixed angular field of view, extending from 13.5∘ to 108∘ from the Sun and approximately 50∘ in the transverse direction. In January 2021, on its seventh orbit, PSP crossed the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) near perihelion at a distance of 20 solar radii. At this time, WISPR observed a broad band of highly variable solar wind and multiple coronal rays. For six days around perihelion, PSP was moving with an angular velocity exceeding that of the Sun. During this period, WISPR was able to image coronal rays as PSP approached and then passed under or over them. We have developed a technique for using the multiple viewpoints of the coronal rays to determine their location (longitude and latitude) in a heliocentric coordinate system and used the technique to determine the coordinates of three coronal rays. The technique was validated by comparing the results to observations of the coronal rays from Solar and Heliophysics Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric COronagraph (LASCO)/C3 and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)-A/COR2. Comparison of the rays’ locations were also made with the HCS predicted by a 3D MHD model. In the future, results from this technique can be used to validate dynamic models of the corona.en_US
dc.identifier.citationLiewer, P.C., Qiu, J., Ark, F. et al. Extracting the Heliographic Coordinates of Coronal Rays Using Images from WISPR/Parker Solar Probe. Sol Phys 297, 128 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11207-022-02058-6en_US
dc.identifier.issn0038-0938
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/handle/1/17644
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.rightscopyright Springer Science and Business Media 2022en_US
dc.subjectcoronaen_US
dc.subjectcoronal streamersen_US
dc.subjectcoronal raysen_US
dc.titleExtracting the Heliographic Coordinates of Coronal Rays Using Images from WISPR/Parker Solar Probeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage1en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage21en_US
mus.citation.issue9en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleSolar Physicsen_US
mus.citation.volume297en_US
mus.data.thumbpage4en_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1007/s11207-022-02058-6en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentPhysics.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US

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