Climate extremes, vegetation change, and de-coupling of interactive fire-grazing processes exacerbate fly parasitism of cattle

dc.contributor.authorScasta, John D.
dc.contributor.authorTalley, Justin L.
dc.contributor.authorEngle, David M.
dc.contributor.authorDebinski, Diane M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-23T21:57:29Z
dc.date.available2018-08-23T21:57:29Z
dc.date.issued2017-02
dc.description.abstractWe assessed local horn fly (Haematobia irritans L.) and face fly (Musca autumnalis De Geer) communities on cattle in 2012 and 2013 relative to vegetation and climate data to understand how parasitism of cattle is influenced by change in climate and vegetation structure. We compared heterogeneity management using spatially and temporally discrete fires (i.e., patch-burning one-third of a pasture annually) to homogeneity management (i.e., burning entire pasture in 2012 then no burning in 2013), with cattle grazing all years in both treatments. Predicted emergence of horn flies and face flies was 24 and 34 d earlier in 2012 associated with earlier spring warming, a significant deviation from the five-year mean. Intraannual horn fly dynamics were explained by concurrent high ambient air temperature the day of observations, but face flies were explained by low ambient air temperatures and dry conditions 3 wk before observations. Importance values of information for the theoretic models including fire treatments ranged from 0.89 to 1, indicating that both horn flies and face flies are sensitive to habitat alterations and fire-driven animal movements. Ordination indicates herds on unburned pastures were dissimilar to herds on pastures burned with patchy fires or pastures burned completely and species-specific fly responses to different vegetation structure metrics. For example, horn flies were correlated with vegetation visual obstruction, and face flies were correlated with woody plant cover. Vegetation structure may be as important as climate in driving the dynamics of fly parasites of cattle.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipOklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station, Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Iowa Agricultural and Home Economics Experiment Station, and the Iowa State Wildlife Grants program grant #-U-2-R-1 in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program (#-U-2-R-1) and supported in part by the College of Agricultural and Natural Resources and Department of Ecosystem Science and Management at the University of Wyoming.en_US
dc.identifier.citationScasta, John D., Justin L. Talley, David M. Engle, and Diane M. Debinski. 2017. Climate extremes, vegetation change, and de-coupling of interactive fire-grazing processes exacerbate fly parasitism of cattle. Environmental Entomology, 46(2), 191–200. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ee/nvw171.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0046-225X
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarworks.montana.edu/handle/1/14701
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.titleClimate extremes, vegetation change, and de-coupling of interactive fire-grazing processes exacerbate fly parasitism of cattleen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
mus.citation.extentfirstpage191en_US
mus.citation.extentlastpage200en_US
mus.citation.issue2en_US
mus.citation.journaltitleEnvironmental Entomologyen_US
mus.citation.volume46en_US
mus.contributor.orcidDebinski, Diane M.|0000-0002-7144-4640en_US
mus.data.thumbpage8en_US
mus.identifier.categoryLife Sciences & Earth Sciencesen_US
mus.identifier.doi10.1093/ee/nvw171en_US
mus.relation.collegeCollege of Letters & Scienceen_US
mus.relation.departmentEcology.en_US
mus.relation.universityMontana State University - Bozemanen_US

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